Roundtable

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, March, 2015 Edition

Our speaker on March 24th will be Ron Kelly. He’s program will be about the Battle of Helena.

Civil War History for the month of March
March 3, 1863, Enrollment Act passed
March 3, 1865, Congress creates Freeman’s Bureau
March 4, 1861, Lincoln inaugurated 16th President
The first secession convention led by pro-Unionist majority, convened in Little Rock
March 4, 1865, President Lincoln’s second inaugural
March 4, 1826, General John Buford, U.S., born
March 6, 1831, General Philip H. Sheridan, U.S., born
March 7, 1862, Battle of Pea Ridge
March 8, 1862, Battle of Pea Ridge ended in Confederate defeat
March 9, 1862, Battle of USS Monitor and CSS Virginia
March 12, 1864, Red River Campaign begins
U. S. Grant promoted to command all Union forces
March 13, 1862, The action at Spring River ended in Union victory
March 16, 1861, The Territory of Arizona secedes
March 16, 1865, The 6th Ark. Volunteer Infantry fought its last C.W. battle in Bentonville, NC
March 17, 1828, General Patrick Cleburne, C.S., born
March 17, 1865, Campaign to capture Mobile begins
March 20, 1862, Former AR governor John Selden Roane received a commission as a Brigadier General in
the Confederate army
March 22, 1817, General Brayton Bragg, C.S. born
March 23, 1864, General Frederick Steele moved his troops south from LR beginning what came to be
known as the Camden Expedition
March 28, 1818, General Wade Hampton, C.S., born
March 28, 1862, Taylor marches to reinforce Jackson
March 28, 1865, Appomattox Campaign begins
(from Legends in Gray Calendar, 2014 and The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture calendar, 2011)

Since we did not have a meeting February, included are the January 27th minutes.
Minutes, January 27, 2015 meeting
Meeting was called to order by President, Jan Sarna.

Quorum was declared.

Motion was made, seconded and passed to accept the minutes from the October meeting.

Treasurer reported that he had not received the bank statement but we should have est. $2,555 in the bank.

President, Jan Sarna introduced the speaker, Tom Ezell.

Our next meeting will be Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 7:000p.m. at 2nd Presbyterian Church.

 

 

 

 

 

Roundtable

 

Tonight’s Meeting has been canceled due to the weather!  February 24, 2015!

 

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, February, 2015 Edition
Once again, it is time for the annual dues. Dues are $20.00 per family. Also we are trying to update our information on members. If, when you send in your money, give us your name, address, phone numbers, and e-mail address on a slip of paper in print (you know, sometimes we cannot read your scripted handwriting), this would be a big help.

There will be the reenactment of the Battle of Helena on March 12, 13, & 14. Go to arkansastoothpick.com for more information.

Thanks to Tom Ezell for his talk in January.

Our speaker on February 24th will be Rob MacGregor. He’s program will be about Nathan Bedford Forrest before the war.

Civil War History for the month of January
Feb. 1, 1861, Texas secedes
Feb. 1, 1865, Sherman begins Carolina Campaign
Feb. 1, 1861, Gov. Henry Rector called for volunteers to help defend LR against Fed. troops falsely rumored to be heading up AR River
Feb. 2, 1803, Gen. Albert S. Johnson CS born
Feb. 3, 1807, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston CS born
Feb. 3, 1864, Meridan Campaign begins
Feb. 3, 1865, Peace talks begin
Feb. 5, 1861, The Yell Rifles received orders to seize the Fed. Arsenal at LR
Feb. 6, 1832, Gen. John Brown Gordon CS born
Feb. 6, 1833, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart CS born
Feb. 6, 1834, Gen William Dorsey Pender CS born
Feb. 6, 1861, Gov. Henry Rector send a note to Capt. James Totten requesting his surrender of the arsenal in LR
Feb. 8, 1820, Gen. William T. Sherman US born
Feb. 8, 1862, Battle of Roanoke Island
Feb. 8, 1861, Fed. troops evacuate the arsenal at LR
Feb. 9, 1861, Jeff Davis elected President of the Confederacy
Feb. 9, 1864, Future Gov. Daniel Jones Webster married Margaret Hadley of Hamburg and then returned to command his regiment
Feb. 12, 1809, Abraham Lincoln born
Feb. 12, 1861, Gov. Henry Rector had state troops seize a marine hospital and any ammunition shipments in the town of Napoleon (Desha County) to prevent them from falling into Union hands
Feb. 13, 2862, Battle of Ft. Donelson
Feb. 14, 1824, Gen. Winfield S. Hancock US born
Feb. 16, 1862, In the first military engagement of the C. W. in AR, Confederate & Union troops clashed at Pott’s Hill in Benton County
Feb. 17, 1865, Columbia surrenders
Feb. 18, 1862, The Action at Bentonville ended in Union victory
(from Legends in Gray Calendar, 2014 and The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture calendar, 2011)
Minutes, January 27, 2015 meeting
Meeting was called to order by President, Jan Sarna.

Quorum was declared.

Motion was made, seconded and passed to accept the minutes from the October meeting.

Treasurer reported that he had not received the bank statement but we should have est. $2,555 in the bank.

President, Jan Sarna introduced the speaker, Tom Ezell.

Our next meeting will be Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 7:000p.m. at 2nd Presbyterian Church.

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, January, 2015 Edition

Roundtable

Once again, it is time for the annual dues. Dues are $20.00 per family. Also we are trying to update our information on members. If, when you send in your money, give us your name, address, phone numbers, and e-mail address on a slip of paper in print (you know, sometimes we cannot read your scripted handwriting), this would be a big help.

 

Tom Ezell will be our speaker for the January 27th meeting. Tom’s subject is Free Masons in the Civil War.

 

Civil War History for the month of January

 

January 1, 1863, Lincoln signs Emancipation Proclamation

January 2, 1863, 2nd Battle of Murfreesboro

January 8, 1821, General James Longstreet, C. S. born

January 8, 1864, David O. Dodd was hanged on the grounds of St. John’s College in LR after being convicted as a Confederate spy

January 9, 1861, Mississippi secedes

January 9, 1863, The Battle of Arkansas Post began

January 10, 1861, Florida secedes

January 10, 1862, Confederate General Earl Van Dorn was assigned to take over command of the Trans-Miss. Theater

January 11, 1861, Alabama secedes

January 11, 1862, After 2 days of fighting, Union forces destroyed the Confederate fort at Arkansas Post

January 12, 1863, Conf. soldiers captured at the Battle of AR Post were sent up the Mississippi River to prison camps

January 13, 1865, Adm. Porter, U. S., attacks Fort Fisher

January 14, 1865, Col. Williams H. Brooks led a Confederate force of 1,500 men to the Arkansas River to assess the strength of Union garrisons along the river

January 16, 1815, Gen. Henry W. Halleck, U. S., born

January 17, 1865, the Action at Ivey’s Ford, part of the last serious Conf. attempt to challenge Union control of the Arkansas River, took place

January 18, 1862, Battle of Mill Springs

January 19, 1807, Gen. Robert E. Lee, C. S., born

January 19, 1861, Georgia secedes

January 19, 1862, Battle of Mill Springs

January 19, 1864, Arkansas third constitution was adopted, providing for a Unionist government

January 21, 1813, Gen. John Fremont, U. S., born

January 21, 1824, Gen. Thomas J. Jackson, C. S., born

January 26, 1861, Louisiana secedes

January 26, 1863, Hooker takes command of U. S. forces

January 28, 1825, Gen. George Pickett, C. S., born

(from Legends in Gray Calendar, 2014 and The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture calendar, 2011)

Minutes, November, 2014 meeting

Meeting was called to order by President, Jan Sarna.

Quarum was declared.

Motion was made, seconded and passed to accept the minutes from the October meeting.

Treasurer reported that we hve a total of $2,555.34 in the bank.

Motion was made, seconded, and passed that the proposed slate of officers (Jan Sarna, President; Dick Brannon, Vice President; Brian Brown, Treasurer; Jane Anne Spikes, Secretary; Lonnie Spikes, Programs; and Lonnie & Jane Anne Spikes, Newsletter) be accepted by acclamation.

 

President, Jan Sarna introduced the speaker, Glenn Schwarz.

Our next meeting will be Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at 7:000p.m. at 2nd Presbyterian Church.

Robert E. Lee Bill

January 23, 2015

From the U.D.C.:

I have received many calls, messages and texts with regard to the article that appeared in Thursday’s Arkansas section of the Arkansas Democrat Gazette Newspaper. Representative Nate Bell of Mena and Representative Fred Love of Little Rock have proposed a bill that would eliminate General Robert E. Lee’s name from the holiday celebrated the 3rd Monday in January.  The holiday is currently shared with the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday.   I ask that you please contact your State Representatives and Senators now and voice your opposition to this bill.   Please share this information and the contact information with anyone who may support our concerns.  It will take all of our efforts to win this battle.  I ask that you please be respectful and courteous in your comments

Arkansas established the holiday representing Robert E. Lee’s birthday in 1947.  It was not until 1983 that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s birthday was recognized.  In 1985 the Legislature merged the two holidays.  I understand that these Representatives have gained all of the support they need to pass the bill.  We must act NOW to prevent this bill from passing.
If you are not aware of who your Representative is or how to contact him/her, please refer to this site.  All you do is enter your address and city in the search box.  You will get the names of your Representative and Senator.  Clicking on their name will give you their contact information.
I have also attached a list of the Committee members who will vote on this bill.  Please contact each one and voice your opposition. 
I understand that the Committee meets next Wednesday, January 28, 2015.  I will share more information as it becomes available.  We need everyone to gather as many supporters as you can to  show up at the State Capitol on Wednesday.  At the door you may sign in as “opposed” to the bill.  Numbers count this time!
Please, please contact as many of these lawmakers as you can as soon as possible.  Ladies, we must protect our heritage–for us and for our children.
Kay Tatum, President
Arkansas Division, UDC

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, December, 2014 Edition

We want to thank Glen Schwarz for his presentation in November on the General Patrick Cleburne.
Once again, it is time for the annual dues. Dues are $20.00 per family. Also we are trying to update our
information on members. If, when you send in your money, give us your name, address, phone numbers, and e-
mail address on a slip of paper in print (you know, sometimes we cannot read your scripted handwriting), this
would be a big help.
There is no meeting in December. We will see you next year. Our next meeting will be January 27, 2015.
Here is a lineup of the speakers for 2015:
January
Tom Ezell
February
Rob McGregor
Forrest Pre-war
March
Ron Kelly
Battle of Helena
April
Steve Purdue
Fagan & Crawford Saline County’s own
May
Vernon Dutton
June
Hank Simmons
Confederate money & bonds
July
Brian Brown
August
Mark Christ
September
Bobby Roberts
October
November
Drew Hodges

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all from Lonnie & Jane Anne Spikes

Civil War History for the month of December
December 2, 1864, Confederate soldiers who were defeated at the battle of Westport in Missouri reach Lanesport in southwest Arkansas.
December 3, 1826, General George B. McClellan, U.S. born.
December 3, 1865, James Southall, later a founding member of what is now UAMS, was exchanged, with other confederates, for Union prisoners after being held at Ft. McHenry in Maryland.
December 4, 1865, The third shooting in the Pope County Militia War took place when George W. Newton, a former Confederate major and later a Baptist preacher, killed county Clerk William Stoot.
December 5, 1839, General George Custer, U.S. born.
December 6, 1833, Col. John S. Mosby, C.S. born.
December 6, 1862, In preparation for the Battle of Prairie Grove, Conf. cavalry drove in Union brigadier general James G. Blunt’s pickets on Reed’s Mt.
December 6, 1865, 13 Amendment passed.
December 7, 1862, The Battle of Prairie Grove began at dawn.
December 8, 1863, Lincoln makes proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction.
December 9, 1861, Seventy seven captured members of a secret pro-Union Peace Society in north central Arkansas were sent to Little Rock.
December 13, 1862, Battle of Fredericksburg.
December 13, 1864, Ft. McAllister surrenders.
December 14, 1862, Patrick Cleburne, the highest-ranking Irish-born officer in American military history, was promoted to Major General.
December 15-16, 1864, Battle of Nashville
December 20, 1860, South Carolina secedes
December 25, 1862, Clara Barton, born
December 27, 1862, About 8,000 Union troops marched south toward Van Buren after the Battle of Prairie Grove.
December 31, 1815, General George Meade, U.S. born
December 31, 1862, Second Battle of Murfreesboro, also known as the Battle of Stone’s River.
(from Legends in Gray Calendar, 2014 and The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture calendar

Roundtable

 

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, November, 2014 Edition
We want to thank Brian Brown for his wonder presentation last month on the “Scoundrels and Rogues of the Civil War”. It was a very entertaining presentation.

Tuesday, November 25th, 7:00p.m. at 2nd Presbyterian Church, our speaker will be Glen Schwarz. Glen will be speaking on Patrick Cleburne.

Once again, it is time for the annual dues. Dues are $20.00 per family. Also we are trying to update our information on members. If, when you send in your money, give us your name, address, phone numbers, and e-mail address on a slip of paper in print (you know, sometimes we cannot read your scripted handwriting), this would be a big help.

At the November meeting, there will be an election of officers. If you would like to volunteer or know of someone that would like to be elected to any of the positions, please nominate them at the November meeting. Current officers are:
Jan Sarna, President
Dick Brannon, Vice President
Brian Brown, Treasurer
Jane Anne Spikes, Secretary
Lonnie Spikes, Programs
Lonnie & Jane Anne Spikes, Newsletter

MINUTES
Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas
2nd Presbyterian Church
October 28, 2014 at 7:00 p.m.

President, Jan Sarna, called the meeting to order.

A quorum was present.

Motion was made, seconded & passed to accept the September meeting minutes.

Treasurer’s Report: We have an estimated $2,200.00 in our checking account.

Motion was made and seconded to spend $80.00 for an ad for the CWRT in the Emerald City of the South Newspaper. Motion passed

There are concerns about the Fouche Dam Pike site. The grass needs cutting one more time this season. Motion was made and seconded to hire a lawn service to keep this area respectable and limit the spending to $100.00. Motion passed.

At the November meeting there will need to be an election of the 2015 officers. Motion was made to leave the slate the same (Jan Sarna, President; Dick Brannon, Vice President; Brian Brown, Treasurer; Jane Anne Spikes, Secretary). Motion was overturned. Request was to hold elections until the November meeting.

Glen Schwarz will have the program in November. He will be talking about Patrick Cleburne.

Our speaker, Jan Sarna, introduced Brian Brown as our speaker.

Meeting was adjourned and the next meeting will be November 25, 2014.

Civil War History for the month of November
November 1, 1861 McClellan replaces Scott as commander of U. S. forces.
November 3, 1816 General Jubal A. Early, C.S., born.
November 3, 1862 Henry Massie Rector resigned as governor of Arkansas after his run for re-election was crushed by Harris Flanagin.
November 5, 1862 McClellan removed from command.
November 5, 1862 Dandridge McRae was promoted to rand of brigadier general.
November 6, 1861 Jefferson David re-elected President of Confederacy.
November 7, 1861 Union forces capture Port Royal.
November 8, 1861 Wilkes seizes Confederate Commissioners.
November 9, 1825 General Ambrose P. Hill, C.S., born.
November 9, 1864 Lincoln re-elected for second term.
November 11 Veterans Day.
November 13, 1814 General Joseph Hooker, U. S., born.
November 15, 1864 Sherman begins “March to the Sea”.
November 15, 1862 Harris Flanagin was inaugurated as Arkansas’ 7th governor.
November 17, 1861 The Arkansas Confederate authorities discovered a secret pro-Union Peace Society in north-central Arkansas.
November 19, 1863 Lincoln delivers Gettysburg Address.
November 23-25, 1863 Battle of Chattanooga.
November 26, 1862 Woodruff County Arkansas was established.
November 27, 1863 Patrick Cleburne led his division to make a stand at Ringgold Gap, GA.
November 28, 1861 Missouri formally admitted to Confederacy.
November 28, 1862 The Engagement at Cane Hill, AR ended in Union victory.
November 30, 1864 Battle of Franklin, TN
November 30, 1864 Patrick Cleburne was killed while leading a charge on the Union breastworks.
(from Legends in Gray Calendar, 2014 and The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture calendar, 2011)
Hope to see all Tuesday night for a wonderful program.

 

Roundtable

 

Gen. Robert E. Lee’s home in Virginia.

The previously unknown photograph depicts Selina Gray, the head housekeeper to Lee and his family, along with two girls. The photograph was unveiled Thursday at the Arlington House plantation overlooking the nation’s capital that was home to Lee and dozens of slaves before the Civil War. An inscription on the back of the image reads “Gen Lees Slaves Arlington Va.”

Park officials said this is only the second known photograph taken of slaves at Arlington.

“It’s extremely rare to have an identified photo of an enslaved person,” said National Park Service spokeswoman Jenny Anzelmo-Sarles. “Since slaves were considered property, it’s very rare to have a photo where you can identify the people in the photo.”

Gray is noted in history books for helping to save Arlington House after Lee’s family left and the plantation was captured by Union troops during the Civil War. Arlington House was originally built as a monument to George Washington. Lee’s wife, Mary Curtis Lee, entrusted the home to Gray, and she later confronted a Union general about soldiers pilfering Washington family heirlooms from the house. She was able to have the items safeguarded.

The photograph was purchased on eBay in September for $700 after a volunteer found it online. The seller was based in England and found the photo in a box of unwanted images. The nonprofit Save Arlington House Inc. donated funds to acquire the image.

The photograph will be unveiled to the public Saturday, and it will be used in future exhibits after Arlington House and its slave quarters are restored over the next two years. Historians will study the image and hope to learn more about it.

Civil War History for the month of October

October 4, 1862 Daniel Webster Jones, future governor of Arkansas, was shot and taken prisoner by Union forces in Corinth, MS.

October 10, 1837 Col. Robert Gould Shaw, U. S. Born

October 10, 1862 Leonidas Polk, the first Episcopal Bishop of Arkansas, was promoted to Lt. General in the Confederate Army

October 19, 1864 Battle of Cedar Creek

October 20, 1819 Gen. Daniel E. Sickles, U.S. born

October 21, 1861 Battle of Ball’s Bluff

October 21, 1861 Guerrilla leader Howell A. “Doc” Rayburn joined the Conf. Army, enlisting Co. C, 12th Texas Cavalry

October 23, 1864 Federal and Conf. forces met just outside of present day Bryant (Saline County) in a minor engagement known as the skirmish oat Hurricane Creek

October 25, 1863 The action at Pine Bluff ended in Union victory

October 27, 1862 Union Colonel William Dewey surprised Conf. Col. John Q. Burbridge’s brigade at Pitman’s Ferry

(from Legends in Gray Calendar, 2014 and The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture calendar, 2011)

Hope to see all Tuesday night for a wonderful program.

 

MINUTES

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas

2nd Presbyterian Church

Rooms 62-63

September 23, 2014 at 7:00 p.m.

President, Jan Sarna, called the meeting to order.

A quorum was present.

Motion was made, seconded & passed to accept the August meeting minutes. 

Treasurer’s Report: We have $2,191.38 in our checking account. Pris has contacted Google ads and we should be getting $470.00 from them. Motion was made, seconded & passed to accept the Treasurer’s report. 

We are still needing a person to volunteer as the Chairperson for the Arkansas Civil War Heritage Trail. The position was held by Rick Meadows. This is a volunteer position. It was asked of this group for a volunteer to take over this position. This question will be asked again at the October meeting.

 

Our speaker, Jan Sarna, introduced himself.

Meeting was adjourned and the next meeting will be October 28, 2014.

 

Arkansas Toothpick Civil War Quiz 

The Arkansas Toothpick (arkansastoothpick.com) now hosts a fun trivia quiz every week to keep our readers coming back for more. If you get too many wrong, you might be accused of being a carpet bagger, or even worse: a Yankee! If you have any ideas on a upcoming quiz, email us at info@arkansastoothpick.com.

 

 

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, September, 2014 Edition

We want to thank Mark Christ for his wonder presentation last month on Confederate General Joseph O. Shelby’s operations in the summer of 1864.

Tuesday, September 23rd, 7:00p.m. at 2nd Presbyterian Church, our speaker will be our own President Jan Sarna.  Jan will be speaking on the Great Raid in Vermont.

Come and hear Jan Tuesday night. 

EFFORTS UNDERWAY TO ACQUIRE, PROTECT ELKINS’ FERRY BATTLEFIELD

PRESCOTT, AR—The Nevada County Depot and Museum, in cooperation with the Prescott-Nevada County Economic Development Foundation, The Conservation Fund, The Civil War Trust and the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, an agency of the Department of Arkansas Heritage, is working to acquire 448 acres of the Elkins’ Ferry Battlefield near Prescott, the museum board announced in a statement.

“A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire almost the entire Nevada County portion of the Elkins’ Ferry Battlefield has arisen, and we are working with local, state and national partners to see it through,” the statement said. “Once acquired, this battlefield, which is a National Historic Landmark, can be developed to attract heritage tourists and has the potential to make a major economic impact on our community.”

The Nevada County Depot and Museum has established a website at www.elkinsferry.weebly.com that will soon be able to receive donations and will monitor progress on the project. Pledges of $625,000 have already been made toward the project, leaving another $325,000 needed to complete the acquisition.

The battle at Elkins’ Ferry was fought on April 4 and 5, 1864, when Confederate cavalry under General John Sappington Marmaduke fought the leading elements of General Frederick Steele’s Union army as they sought to cross the Little Missouri River on their way to invade Louisiana. After sharp combat, the Confederates fell back to Prairie D’Ane. After skirmishing there for several days, Steele’s army ended up abandoning their drive south and instead diverted to Camden in search of supplies.

The National Park Service describes the Elkins’ Ferry Battlefield: “Elkins Ferry is among the most pristine Civil War battlefields in Arkansas. This rural area has only seen slight changes since the Civil War. Like other battlefields associated with the Camden Expedition of 1864, it offers a tremendous opportunity for preservation and interpretation of the entire historical landscape.” It was designated a National Historic Landmark on April 19, 1994.

Tax-deductible donations can be mailed to the Nevada County Depot and Museum, 403 West First Street South, Prescott, AR 71857; be sure to specify that they are targeted toward the Elkin’s Ferry Battlefield Preservation Project.

 

Civil War History for the month of September

September 1, 1863 The action at Devil’s Backbone ended in Union victory

September 2, 1864 Atlanta surrenders

September 5, 1863 Britain seizes Confederate ships and shipyard

September 6, 1819 General William S. Rosencrans, U.S., born

September 6, 1861 Grant moves into Paducah

September 6, 1863 Confederate Generals John S. Marmaduke and Lucius M. Walker fought a duel near Scott, AR (Pulaski County)

September 8, 1828 General Joshua Chamberlain, U.S., born

September 10, 1836 General Joseph Wheeler, C.S., born

September 10, 1863 The Arkansas State Gazette suspended operations after Union forces captured Little Rock

September 11, 1861 Union victory at Cheat Mountain

September 14, 1863 The Fifth Kansas Regiment under the command of Colonel Powell Clayton was dispatched to Pine Bluff to restore law & order

September 15, 1862 Jackson captures Harper’s Ferry

September 17, 1862 Battle of Antietam

September 19, 1863 Battle of Chickamauga

September 19, 1864 Battle of Winchester

September 19, 1861 James Henderson Berry, later the 14th Governor of Arkansas, joined the Confederate Army in Carrollton (Carroll County)

September 20, 1864 Charles Mitchel, who served briefly as U.S. Senator before resigning his office due to secession of Arkansas, died in Hempstead County

September 24, 1864 Sheridan lays waste to the Shenandoah Valley

(from Legends in Gray Calendar, 2014 and The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture calendar, 2011)

Hope to see all Tuesday night for a wonderful program.

Arkansas Toothpick Civil War Quiz Top of Form 1

Bottom of Form 1

 

The Arkansas Toothpick (arkansastoothpick.com) now hosts a fun trivia quiz every week to keep our readers coming back for more. If you get too many wrong, you might be accused of being a carpet bagger, or even worse: a Yankee! The first quiz features questions about Arkansas and the secession crisis in 1861. If you have any ideas on a upcoming quiz, email us at info@arkansastoothpick.com.

MINUTES

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas

2nd Presbyterian Church

Rooms 62-63

August 26, 2014 at 7:00 p.m.

President, Jan Sarna, called the meeting to order.

Introduced Chris Bills as a new member.

A quorum was present. 

Per Brian Brown, Treasurer, we have not received any of our money from Google Ads for the past 8 to 10 months. The issue is that according to the IRS, the Tax ID number that we have been using is not ours. No one is sure where we got this tax id number. To solve this problem, we need to dissolve our present corporation. Motion was made and seconded, to dissolve the present corporation to resolve this problem. Motion passed. 

Rick Meadows was the Chairperson for the Arkansas Civil War Heritage Trail. This is a volunteer position. It was asked of this group for a volunteer to take over this position. This question will be asked again at the September meeting.

Member Mark Bash brought some Arkansas Confederate money.

Meeting was adjourned and the next meeting will be September 23, 2014.

Roundtable

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, August, 2014 Edition

We want to thank Tom DeBlack for his wonder presentation last month.

 

Tuesday, August 26th, 7:00p.m. at 2nd Presbyterian Church, our speaker will be Mark Christ of the Arkansas Sesquicentennial Commission. He will speak on Confederate General Joseph O. Shelby’s operations in the summer of 1864.

Mark is an award winning author and Community Outreach Director of the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. He has a B.A from the University of Arkansas-Little Rock and a M.L.S from the University of Oklahoma. Mark is the author or editor of numerous books about Arkansas’ involvement in the Civil War.

Let us all welcome Mark Tuesday night.

 

MINUTES

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas

2nd Presbyterian Church

Rooms 62-63

July 22, 2014 at 7:00 p.m.

President, Jan Sarna, called the meeting to order.

Visitor Chris Bills was introduced.

A quorum was present.

Motion was made and seconded to accept the minutes from the June 24, 2014 meeting. Motion passed. 

Brian Brown asked that if anyone is receiving the newsletter by mail, and has an e-mail address, please let us know. Our postage bill is adding up.

Don Hamilton asked that if you are near one of the CW monuments, please check it out and see if it needs any attention, like weed eating, trash pickup, etc.

It was brought up that someone in the group needs to contact Rick Meadows’ widow about all of Rick’s books. Rick had told a group that he would like to see his books go to a library. Brian Brown volunteered to contact. The Butler Center has been contacted and they said they would appreciate the books. They will put up a plaque stated that these books were donated in memory of Rick Meadows.

It was brought to our attention that the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Mobile Bay and Siege of Fort Morgan, will be August 1-3.

Thomas DeBlack spoke to us on “Conditions on the Home Front”.

Battle of Long Prairie will be August 5th.

Meeting was adjourned and the next meeting will be August 26, 2014. 

 

Original Surface of the Hunley to be Revealed:

The Actual Skin of Submarine Not Seen by Anyone since Her Loss in 1864

No one alive today has actually seen the original surface of the world’s first successful combat submarine because the H. L. Hunley is completely covered by an encrusted layer of sand, sediment and shells that built up gradually over time around the vessel.

Today, that’s about to change.

The true surface of the Hunley will slowly start to be revealed as Clemson University scientists kick off a year-long effort to remove the brittle concretion masking the legendary submarine and some of her finer features.

“In a short time, we will be able to view the real submarine, not the shadow we see now. All these years of careful study and research have been leading up to this moment. Over the coming months, we may finally learn the full story of the Hunley’s mysterious voyage and disappearance,” said Nestor Gonzalez, Assistant Director of Clemson University’s Warren Lasch Conservation Center.

Until now, archaeologists have been given the difficult task of studying an artifact they could not actually see. Chipping away the concretion could reveal many clues for their investigation to determine why the submarine suddenly vanished in 1864. For example, historical records indicate the Hunley was spotted by crewmen onboard the USS Housatonic shortly before the attack. They opened up small arms fire on the experimental submarine though it did little to save their ship. The Hunley still was able to ram her spar torpedo into the hull, causing one of the Union’s mightiest ships to sink within minutes. With the concretion stripped away, archaeologists could uncover bullet damage that may have impacted the Hunley’s ability to return that night. Or, they could find countless other clues that will help solve one of the world’s greatest maritime mysteries.

While removing the concretion may open up a new avenue of historical discovery, it will also allow for a complete conservation treatment to be applied to the fragile 19th century submarine.

Lost at sea for over a century, the submarine was found in 1995 and then raised in 2000. The salts in the ocean water that permeated the Hunley’s iron skin during her 136-years at sea are like poison, leaving her at risk for corrosion and disintegration if they are not removed.

Since her recovery, the concretion has served as a protective cocoon, helping stop further corrosion that can be caused by exposure to oxygen. At the same time, the layer has served as a barrier inhibiting the team’s ability to implement a conservation plan necessary for the Hunley’s survival. Once the concretion is stripped away, it will allow for the free flow of a liquid conservation treatment to reach the metal of the submarine and leach out the salts threatening her existence.

Conservators will be working within extremely cramped conditions using hand tools, chisels and hammers to remove the debris material. It will be stressful, with one wrong sleight of hand potentially resulting in damaging an irreplaceable piece of history. The concretion encases the entire vessel both inside and out. In some places, it is harder and stronger than the actual iron it covers. The Hunley has been soaking in a bath of sodium hydroxide for the last three months designed to loosen up the concretion and ease its removal. The chemical solution appears to have done its job, which will hopefully make the work go more quickly and without incident to the submarine.

The deconcretion project may take up to twelve months to complete. During that time, the 76,000-gallon tank that holds the Hunley will be drained of the chemical solution Tuesday through Thursday. The worksite will be an active caustic environment due to the presence of chemicals, making safety precautions for the scientific team of paramount importance. They will be required to wear face masks, gloves, specialized clothing and goggles the entire time to protect them from any chemical residue that may remain on the Hunley or in her tank.

The concretion will first be chiseled away from the outside of the submarine then the team will move to the inside, where it is much more firmly attached. For the first few weeks, scientists will begin exposing exterior areas that were preselected due to their overall stability and low level of archaeological interest. This will allow for the team to hone their skills and acclimate to the environment before they face the complex challenges of working on potentially evidence-rich areas and within the tight confines of the crew compartment.

For more information, please visit www.Hunley.org.

Civil War History for the month of August

 

August 1, 1864, Powell Clayton, future governor of Arkansas, was promoted to rank of Brig. Gen., Union Army

August 2, 1862, The skirmish at Jonesboro ended in Conf. victory

August 3, 1862, The skirmish at L’Anguille Ferry ended in Conf. victory

August 6, 1862, The CSS Arkansas was abandoned and scuttled after unsuccessfully engaging the Union ironclad Essey near Baton Rouge, LA

August 10, 1861, The 2nd Ark. Mounted Rifles, organized under Col. James McIntosh, saw action at the battle of Wilson’s Creek in Missouri

August 17, 1862, Uprising of Sioux Indians

August 19, 1863, Gen. Lucius Polk, who served under Maj. Gen. Patrick Cleburne, married Sally Moore, a distant cousin

August 21, 1821, Gen. William Barksdale, C.S., was born

August 24, 1864, The action at Ashley’s Station ended in Conf. victory

August 25, 1863, The skirmish at Brownsville ended in Union victory

August 27, 1863, The action at Bayou Meto was fought as Conf. troops sought to hinder the advance of the Union Army toward Little Rock

August 28, 1861, Fort Hatteras falls

August 29 & 30, 1862, Second Battle of Bull Run

August 29, 1861, Conf. Gen. William J. Hardee arrived at Pocahontas to take charge of forces there

August 30, 1862, At the Battle of Richmond in Kentucky, Gen. Patrick Cleburne was struck in the face by shrapnel and forced to leave the field.

(from Legends in Gray Calendar, 2014 and The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture calendar, 2011)

Hope to see all Tuesday night for a wonderful program.

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, July, 2014 Edition

Roundtable

We want to thank Phillip McMath for his wonder presentation on David O. Dodd last month.

Tuesday, July 22nd, 7:00p.m. at 2nd Presbyterian Church, our speaker will be Thomas DeBlack, professor of history at Arkansas Tech University. Besides being a professor, Tom is an author and co-author of many books.

He was very instrumental in the Lakeport Plantation Project. He has enough information on Lakeport Plantation to fill a book, and that’s what he intends to do this summer, but that task has to go on his list.

DeBlack knows the ins and outs of writing a book: He’s the author of With Fire and Sword: Arkansas, 1861-1874 – a history of the Civil War and Reconstruction in Arkansas – which he pulled off a wall of bookshelves in his small office in Witherspoon Hall.

DeBlack also co-authored Arkansas: A Narrative History, a college-level textbook and a book “for the general reader,” he said. One of the other coauthors was Morris Arnold, a federal judge and “foremost expert on Colonial Arkansas.”

Both books have won awards.

DeBlack also contributed a chapter to Rugged and Sublime, a book about the Civil War.

Let us all welcome Tom Tuesday night and hear about the Conditions on the Home Front.

 

Minutes of June 24, 2014 Meeting

The CWRT of Arkansas met on June 24. Phillip McMath was the speaker. His topic was David O. Dodd and he presented an excellent talk, complete with original and previously unknown sources of information.

(a) We took in $31 at the meeting.

(b) There was a request that any member who is currently receiving his newsletter by mail, if possible, convert to e-mail.

(c) I, as acting secretary, have written several regional Civil War Roundtables and will attempt to write additional CWRT’s and notify them of the change of address.

(d) Art English has agreed to all each speaker and remind him/her of the upcoming meeting.

(e) Several potential future speakers were identified, including Arkansas State Archeologist (870) 535-4509, Jhouse@ualr.edu. Other potential speakers are Tom Ezell, Drew Hodges and Bobby Roberts.

(f) Glen Schwarz joined the CWRT officially.

Meeting was adjourned.

Civil War History for the month of July

July 1, 2, 3, 1863 Battles of Gettysburg

July 4, 1863 Vicksburg surrenders

July 5, 1801 Adm. David G. Farragut, U.S. born

July 7, 1862 the action at Hill’s Plantation ended in Union victory

July 8, 1864 approximately 250 soldiers of 10th Ill. Cavalry moved out of Little Rock to occupy Searcy

July 9, 1863 Port Hudson surrenders

July 12, 1862 Albert Pike resigned from his position in the Conf. Army to protest Gen. Thomas Hindman’s extension of his authority over Indian Territory

July 13, 1821 General Nathan B. Forrest, C.S. born

July 13, 1861 Union forces secure West Virginia

July 13, 1862 first battle of Murfreesboro

July 14, 1862 Hot Springs ended its tenure as Arkansas’ State Capitol

July 18, 1863 Battle of Ft. Wagner

July 20, 1861 Company B, First Arkansas Mounted Volunteers, transferred into Confederate Service

July 21, 1861 first Battle of Bull Run

July 21, 1861 The First Arkansas Infantry participated under Colonel James Fleming Fagan

July 22, 1864 Battle of Atlanta

July 26, 1864 the action at Wallace’s Ferry ended in a draw

July 27, 1864 Confederates reportedly took almost 127 prisoners after attacking a Union camp at Massard Prairie

July 28, 1864 a skirmish was fought at Scatterville, AR, (near present day Rector, Clay County)

July 29, 1862 “Alabama” sails out of England

July 30, 1864 Battle of the Crater

July 31, 1864 the action at Ft. Smith ended in Union victory

(from Legends in Gray Calendar, 2014 and The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture calendar, 2011)

Hope to see all Tuesday night for a wonderful program
FYI: Ron Kelley has written a book on 1860 Arkansas. Hopefully he will bring copies when he will be our speaker in March, 2015.