Ozarks Civil War
Sesquicentennial Weekly
Len Eagleburger, Editor, Springfield, Missouri December 27, 2010
Ozarks Civil War Sesquicentennial Weekly Launched!
Len Eagleburger has initiated a news source for those interested in happenings,
reenactments and events in the Trans-Mississippi Theatre of the Civil War. On a
weekly basis, he will post all news he has come across from the news media and other
sources. All news sources are provided with a link. He will also provide researched
stories of his own from time to time, starting this issue and may be reproduced
without his permission, with the story of James P. Snedicor, a veteran of the Battle of
Wilson’s Creek. For those who are not familiar with Len, he is the author of “The
Fighting 10th, the History of the 10th Missouri Cavalry US” and former Media
Director and Newsletter Editor for the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks of
which he is a Life Member. He is also a member of the Civil War Preservation
Trust, Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield Foundation, Greene County (MO)
Historical Society, and Sons of Union Veterans Phelps Camp #66. His great-great
Grandfather, William Gracen Cooper served as a Private in Company “C” of the
10th Missouri Cavalry US as a bodyguard/escort to Brigadier General Francis
“Frank” P. Blair during Union Major General U.S. Grant’s Vicksburg Campaign.
Len is a native Ozarkian, being born and raised in Springfield, Missouri.
Articles and News Events Welcome! Happy Reading!
Articles and News Events of Civil War events in the Trans-Missippi Theatre are
welcomed. Please send to leneagleburger@sbcglobal.net
Original Civil War Photos
THESE PIXS ARE VERY PROFOUND It is fortunate that they have survived. Most
probably a million wet plate photos were made during the civil war on glass plate
Popular during the war, they lost their appeal afterwards and so many were sold
for the glass, which was then used in green houses. Over the years the sun
caused the images to disappear.These are pretty amazing considering they were
taken up to 150 years ago: A compendium of photos from era of the War Between
the States.
Click photo to enlarge and for the caption.
http://www.mikelynaugh.com/VirtualCivilWar/New/Originals2/index.html
Did Abe Lincoln’s Assassin Escape? DNA May Solve Mystery
(AOL NEWS)
http://www.aolnews.com/2010/12/23/did-abraham-lincoln-assassin-john-wilkes-boothescape-
dna-mays/?
icid=maing%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec1_lnk3%7C33063&a_dgi=aolshare_facebook&a
_dgi=aolshare_email
Civil War message opened, decoded: No help coming
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101225/ap_on_re_us/us_message_in_a_bottle
A war of words
http://www.columbiatribune.com/news/2010/dec/26/cweditorials122610/
States scrimp on war commemorations
www.news-leader.com, go to:
http://www.news-leader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/201012270257/NEWS07/12270333
James P. Snedicor
by Len Eagleburger
Dec. 22, 1861 — In Missouri, the bands of partisans, guerrillas, freebooters and plain
bandits continued their operations pretty much as they had been doing for the years known
as “Bleeding Kansas.” Today the commander of Federal forces in the state, Gen. H. W.
Halleck, issued orders that anyone caught burning bridges, damaging railroad tracks or
molesting telegraph wires would be summarily executed upon capture.
16 year old Private James Snedicor, the youngest member of the Callaway Guards
(Company A 3rd Division MSG) was wounded but survived the battle of Wilson’s Creek,
only to be arrested one year later for guerilla activities. He was arrested by his older
brother, Provost Marshal Isaac D Snedicor, who had joined the Union Army. He was tried
3 Len Eagleburger, Editor, Springfield, Missouri Newsletter Date
and executed. Below is the Trial Transcript from ” Official Records of the War of the
Rebellion”.:
James P. Snedicor
From the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion
31 R R—SER II, VOL 1, pages 481, 482
CHARGE 1: Aiding in the destruction of the North Missouri Railroad. Specification—In
this, that on the night of the 20th day of December, 1561, James P. Sne~dicor w~th other
persons unknown did unlawfully within the Military Dis- trict of North Missouri burn and
destroy certain railroad ties and with crowbars, picks, sledges and axes remove certain
rails, which ties and rails formed a part of the common traveled way known as the North
Missouri Railroad. This in violation of martial law then prevailing in the Military District
of North Missouri.
CHARGE 2: Giving aid and comfort to railroad and railroad bridge-burners and
destroyers. Specification.—In this, that the said James P. Snedicor did on the evening or
night of the 20th of December, 1861, meet with other parties unknown and plan the
destruction and by his presence aid, assist and afford comfort and assistance to said jiarties
unknown who did burn and destroy certain ties, rails, track and bridges being part of and
appertaining to the North Missouri Railroad. This in violation of martial law then
prevailing in the said Military District of North Missouri.
CHARGE 3: Accessory before the fact to the destruction of the North Missouri Railroad.
Spccification.—In this, that James P. Snedicor at the county of Callaway, State of Missouri,
on the 19th day of December, 1861, and after that date did solicit divers persons to go to the
track of the North Missouri Railroad in Audrain County, Mo., within the Military District
of North Missouri on the 20th of December, 1861, to then and there ai(l and assist in the
destruction of the North Missouri Railroad. This in violation of martial law then prevailing
in the said Military District of North Mis- souri. To which charges and specifications the
prisoner pleaded as follows: To the first charge and its specification, guilty. 31 R R—SER
II, VOL 1
Page 482- PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC. To the second charge and its specification, guilty.
To the third charge and its specification, not guilty. The commissiou finds the prisoner as
follows: Of the first charge and its specification, guilty. Of the second charge and its
specification, guilty. Of the third charge and its specification, not guilty. And does therefore
sentence him, James P. Snedicor, to be shot to death at such time and place as the
commanding general of this department may direct. Finding and sentence approved. The
sentence will be carried into effect at such time and place as may be hereafter designated
by the general commanding the department. In the meantime the prisoner will be confined
in the military prison at Alton.
********************************************
796 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETO. MILITARY PRISON, Alton, Iii., [July 1,
(‘?)] 1862.
General S. PRICE, Commanding First Division, Western Department, C. S. Army.
DEAR GENERAL: We, the undersigned, members of the C. S. military corps and citizens
of the Confederate States of America, respect- fully ask through our Government to
immediately consider separately and collectively our situations as prisoners of war, now
4 Len Eagleburger, Editor, Springfield, Missouri Newsletter Date
held as crimi nals by the United States Government and incarcerated in the Alton
Penitentiary for executing the orders of; the Confederate Government as directed by her
commissioned officers. Our treatment by the Federal authorities is and has beemi of such a
nature that we deem it absolately necessary to appeal to our Govern ment to throw around
us her safe- guard and relieve us from the horrors of a long imprisonment and the
execution of our sentences. Subjected to great indignity, basely insulted by fiendish
outlaws, tortured by threats of death and punished With a felon’s decree, by being shut up
in a cell day and night for boldly assist. ing the Government we ‘love in r. sisting the
encroachments of a blood- thirsty mobocracy—after undergoing this fiery ordeal we firmly
believe we merit from the Confederate States Government her fullest protec- tion and that
cognizance should be takemi of our cases at the earliest possible moment. With the
earnestness of much-wronged citizens and soldiers we append to this the names*of—
ABSALOM HICKS, – Captain. JOHN C. TOMPKINS. JAMES W. BARNES. JAS. P.
SNED1COR, T. M. SMITH. Captain Recruits. A. R. TOMPKINS, – Lieutenant. GEORGE
H. CUNNINGHAM. R. B. CROWDER. MATTHEW THOMPSON, Captain Recruits.
HENRY V. WILLING, Lieutenant. OWEN C. HICKAM. THOS. S. FOSTER, Surgeon in
~ Division, Missouri State Guard. JOHN W. OWEN, [ See trial Transcript] Recruit.
JAMES STOUT. WILLIAM J. FORSHEY. JOHN PATTON.
CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.—CONFEDERATE. 851 ALTON MILITARY PRISON,
ILL., August 15, 1862. COMMANDING GENERAL, Department of the West of the
Confederate Forces:
1. Matthew Thompson, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, captured in Boone County, Mo.,
belonging to Colonel Dorsey’s regimetit of recruits of the Confederate Army, was tried by a
military commission for bridge burning and assisting in the destroying of the North
Missouri Railroad and was sentenced to death for the same, and is now awaiting the
execution of his sentence in the above-named prison, would respectfully ask the
interference of my Government in my behalf, promising to be as faithful to the Confederate
Government as I ever have been, &c.
2. Absalom Flicks, A. B. Tompkins, John C. Tompkins, of Boone County, Mo.; Henry V.
Willing, J. P. Snedicor, John W. Owen, from Callaway County, Mo.; John Patton, Stephen
Stott, William J. Forshey, Thomas M. Smith, from Boone County, Mo.; George H.
Cunningham, Buck [II. B.] Crowder, William Combs, from Randolph County, Mo.; Dr.
Thomas S. Foster and James Stont; making sixteen in all that we know of now at this time
that have been sentenced to death, mid we have suffered every indignity and insult that yon
can imagine from the Federal authorities, and we hope and trust that our commanderinchief
will do something for our relief. We are, respectfully, your soldiers,* Matthew
Thompson, Absalom Hicks, A. B. Tompkins, John C. Tompkins, Henry V. Willing, J. P.
Snedicor, John Patton, Stephen Stott, Win. J. Forshey, Geo. Cunningham II , Buck [B. B.]
Crowder, John W. Owen, Thos. M. Smith, Wm.Combs, Thomas S. Foster, James Stout.
5 Len Eagleburger, Editor, Springfield, Missouri Newsletter Date

Ozarks Civil WarSesquicentennial WeeklyLen Eagleburger, Editor, Springfield, Missouri December 27, 2010Ozarks Civil War Sesquicentennial Weekly Launched!Len Eagleburger has initiated a news source for those interested in happenings,reenactments and events in the Trans-Mississippi Theatre of the Civil War. On aweekly basis, he will post all news he has come across from the news media and othersources. All news sources are provided with a link. He will also provide researchedstories of his own from time to time, starting this issue and may be reproducedwithout his permission, with the story of James P. Snedicor, a veteran of the Battle ofWilson’s Creek. For those who are not familiar with Len, he is the author of “TheFighting 10th, the History of the 10th Missouri Cavalry US” and former MediaDirector and Newsletter Editor for the Civil War Round Table of the Ozarks ofwhich he is a Life Member. He is also a member of the Civil War PreservationTrust, Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield Foundation, Greene County (MO)Historical Society, and Sons of Union Veterans Phelps Camp #66. His great-greatGrandfather, William Gracen Cooper served as a Private in Company “C” of the10th Missouri Cavalry US as a bodyguard/escort to Brigadier General Francis“Frank” P. Blair during Union Major General U.S. Grant’s Vicksburg Campaign.Len is a native Ozarkian, being born and raised in Springfield, Missouri.Articles and News Events Welcome! Happy Reading!Articles and News Events of Civil War events in the Trans-Missippi Theatre arewelcomed. Please send to leneagleburger@sbcglobal.netOriginal Civil War PhotosTHESE PIXS ARE VERY PROFOUND It is fortunate that they have survived. Mostprobably a million wet plate photos were made during the civil war on glass platePopular during the war, they lost their appeal afterwards and so many were soldfor the glass, which was then used in green houses. Over the years the suncaused the images to disappear.These are pretty amazing considering they weretaken up to 150 years ago: A compendium of photos from era of the War Betweenthe States.2 Len Eagleburger, Editor, Springfield, Missouri Newsletter DateClick photo to enlarge and for the caption.http://www.mikelynaugh.com/VirtualCivilWar/New/Originals2/index.htmlDid Abe Lincoln’s Assassin Escape? DNA May Solve Mystery(AOL NEWS)http://www.aolnews.com/2010/12/23/did-abraham-lincoln-assassin-john-wilkes-boothescape-dna-mays/?icid=maing%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec1_lnk3%7C33063&a_dgi=aolshare_facebook&a_dgi=aolshare_emailCivil War message opened, decoded: No help coming – Yahoo! Newshttp://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101225/ap_on_re_us/us_message_in_a_bottleA war of wordshttp://www.columbiatribune.com/news/2010/dec/26/cweditorials122610/States scrimp on war commemorationswww.news-leader.com, go to:http://www.news-leader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/201012270257/NEWS07/12270333James P. Snedicorby Len EagleburgerDec. 22, 1861 — In Missouri, the bands of partisans, guerrillas, freebooters and plainbandits continued their operations pretty much as they had been doing for the years knownas “Bleeding Kansas.” Today the commander of Federal forces in the state, Gen. H. W.Halleck, issued orders that anyone caught burning bridges, damaging railroad tracks ormolesting telegraph wires would be summarily executed upon capture.16 year old Private James Snedicor, the youngest member of the Callaway Guards(Company A 3rd Division MSG) was wounded but survived the battle of Wilson’s Creek,only to be arrested one year later for guerilla activities. He was arrested by his olderbrother, Provost Marshal Isaac D Snedicor, who had joined the Union Army. He was tried3 Len Eagleburger, Editor, Springfield, Missouri Newsletter Dateand executed. Below is the Trial Transcript from ” Official Records of the War of theRebellion”.:James P. SnedicorFrom the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion31 R R—SER II, VOL 1, pages 481, 482CHARGE 1: Aiding in the destruction of the North Missouri Railroad. Specification—Inthis, that on the night of the 20th day of December, 1561, James P. Sne~dicor w~th otherpersons unknown did unlawfully within the Military Dis- trict of North Missouri burn anddestroy certain railroad ties and with crowbars, picks, sledges and axes remove certainrails, which ties and rails formed a part of the common traveled way known as the NorthMissouri Railroad. This in violation of martial law then prevailing in the Military Districtof North Missouri.CHARGE 2: Giving aid and comfort to railroad and railroad bridge-burners anddestroyers. Specification.—In this, that the said James P. Snedicor did on the evening ornight of the 20th of December, 1861, meet with other parties unknown and plan thedestruction and by his presence aid, assist and afford comfort and assistance to said jiartiesunknown who did burn and destroy certain ties, rails, track and bridges being part of andappertaining to the North Missouri Railroad. This in violation of martial law thenprevailing in the said Military District of North Missouri.CHARGE 3: Accessory before the fact to the destruction of the North Missouri Railroad.Spccification.—In this, that James P. Snedicor at the county of Callaway, State of Missouri,on the 19th day of December, 1861, and after that date did solicit divers persons to go to thetrack of the North Missouri Railroad in Audrain County, Mo., within the Military Districtof North Missouri on the 20th of December, 1861, to then and there ai(l and assist in thedestruction of the North Missouri Railroad. This in violation of martial law then prevailingin the said Military District of North Mis- souri. To which charges and specifications theprisoner pleaded as follows: To the first charge and its specification, guilty. 31 R R—SERII, VOL 1Page 482- PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC. To the second charge and its specification, guilty.To the third charge and its specification, not guilty. The commissiou finds the prisoner asfollows: Of the first charge and its specification, guilty. Of the second charge and itsspecification, guilty. Of the third charge and its specification, not guilty. And does thereforesentence him, James P. Snedicor, to be shot to death at such time and place as thecommanding general of this department may direct. Finding and sentence approved. Thesentence will be carried into effect at such time and place as may be hereafter designatedby the general commanding the department. In the meantime the prisoner will be confinedin the military prison at Alton.********************************************796 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETO. MILITARY PRISON, Alton, Iii., [July 1,(‘?)] 1862.General S. PRICE, Commanding First Division, Western Department, C. S. Army.DEAR GENERAL: We, the undersigned, members of the C. S. military corps and citizensof the Confederate States of America, respect- fully ask through our Government toimmediately consider separately and collectively our situations as prisoners of war, now4 Len Eagleburger, Editor, Springfield, Missouri Newsletter Dateheld as crimi nals by the United States Government and incarcerated in the AltonPenitentiary for executing the orders of; the Confederate Government as directed by hercommissioned officers. Our treatment by the Federal authorities is and has beemi of such anature that we deem it absolately necessary to appeal to our Govern ment to throw aroundus her safe- guard and relieve us from the horrors of a long imprisonment and theexecution of our sentences. Subjected to great indignity, basely insulted by fiendishoutlaws, tortured by threats of death and punished With a felon’s decree, by being shut upin a cell day and night for boldly assist. ing the Government we ‘love in r. sisting theencroachments of a blood- thirsty mobocracy—after undergoing this fiery ordeal we firmlybelieve we merit from the Confederate States Government her fullest protec- tion and thatcognizance should be takemi of our cases at the earliest possible moment. With theearnestness of much-wronged citizens and soldiers we append to this the names*of—ABSALOM HICKS, – Captain. JOHN C. TOMPKINS. JAMES W. BARNES. JAS. P.SNED1COR, T. M. SMITH. Captain Recruits. A. R. TOMPKINS, – Lieutenant. GEORGEH. CUNNINGHAM. R. B. CROWDER. MATTHEW THOMPSON, Captain Recruits.HENRY V. WILLING, Lieutenant. OWEN C. HICKAM. THOS. S. FOSTER, Surgeon in~ Division, Missouri State Guard. JOHN W. OWEN, [ See trial Transcript] Recruit.JAMES STOUT. WILLIAM J. FORSHEY. JOHN PATTON.CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.—CONFEDERATE. 851 ALTON MILITARY PRISON,ILL., August 15, 1862. COMMANDING GENERAL, Department of the West of theConfederate Forces:1. Matthew Thompson, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, captured in Boone County, Mo.,belonging to Colonel Dorsey’s regimetit of recruits of the Confederate Army, was tried by amilitary commission for bridge burning and assisting in the destroying of the NorthMissouri Railroad and was sentenced to death for the same, and is now awaiting theexecution of his sentence in the above-named prison, would respectfully ask theinterference of my Government in my behalf, promising to be as faithful to the ConfederateGovernment as I ever have been, &c.2. Absalom Flicks, A. B. Tompkins, John C. Tompkins, of Boone County, Mo.; Henry V.Willing, J. P. Snedicor, John W. Owen, from Callaway County, Mo.; John Patton, StephenStott, William J. Forshey, Thomas M. Smith, from Boone County, Mo.; George H.Cunningham, Buck [II. B.] Crowder, William Combs, from Randolph County, Mo.; Dr.Thomas S. Foster and James Stont; making sixteen in all that we know of now at this timethat have been sentenced to death, mid we have suffered every indignity and insult that yoncan imagine from the Federal authorities, and we hope and trust that our commanderinchiefwill do something for our relief. We are, respectfully, your soldiers,* MatthewThompson, Absalom Hicks, A. B. Tompkins, John C. Tompkins, Henry V. Willing, J. P.Snedicor, John Patton, Stephen Stott, Win. J. Forshey, Geo. Cunningham II , Buck [B. B.]Crowder, John W. Owen, Thos. M. Smith, Wm.Combs, Thomas S. Foster, James Stout.5

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