Soon to Be Our 50th Year!
FOR THE MEETING TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014

Meets Fourth Tuesday; January-November
Founded March 1964

Second Presbyterian Church

600 Pleasant Valley Drive

Little Rock 
Program at 7 p.m. 
Online:  www.civilwarbuff.org
Jan Sarna, President 

Rick Meadows, Editor 

Roundtable

RMeadows@aaamissouri.com / arcivilwarbuff@gmail.com 
Dues $20 Per Year
VISITORS WELCOME!
WHILE YOU CAN

 VISIT THE BATTLEFIELDS WHEN YOU CAN…

 

“The Gunboat Maurepas”

With

Donna Bentley

jack

Join us Tuesday when Donna Bentley brings us an exciting program on the Confederate Gunboat Maurepas.   Purchased in 1861, the Maurepas patrolled the lower Mississippi River before being transferred to accompany the CSS Pontchartrain along the White River in Arkansas. Bentley will review her history and action that the Maurepas saw in the Civil War, including the shelling of Jacksonport.

 

Originally from Michigan, Bentley joined Jacksonport State Park as interpreter in 1995. Bentley is a 1979 graduate of Western Michigan University and for fourteen years, worked as a Park Ranger for the National Park Service. She has worked at the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, Mount Rushmore, and the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial in St. Louis among others.

 

 

Louisiana Symposium

Defending the Homeland, Union Forces Target Shreveport, Texas and Beyond

 

What – Experts offer insight into the Red River Campaign and its implications. Exhibits and vendors plus a special guided tour of the Mansfield State Historic Site.

 

When – Friday, March 14 to Sunday, March 16

Friday – Meet and Greet

Saturday – Speakers, lunch buffet,  speakers

Sunday – Speaker and Creole Breakfast Buffett

 

Where – Hilton Garden Inn & Homewood Suites, 2015 Old Minden Rd, Bossier City, LA

Cost – Friday –Sunday $100. Includes Friday evening hors d’oeuvres, exhibits and vendors, speakers Saturday and Sunday with Saturday luncheon and Sunday breakfast, plus admission to historic site and guided tour.

 

Speakers include:

Mark Christ, Community Outreach Director, Arkansas Historic Preservation Program

Dr. Thomas Cutrer, Professor of History, Arizona State University

Scott Dearman, Manager, Mansfield State Historic Site

Dr. Gary Joiner, Professor of History, LSU Shreveport

Dr. Richard McCaslin, Professor of History, University of North Texas

Dr. Jeff Prushankin, Professor of History Millersville University in Pennsylvania

Dr. Henry Robertson, Professor of History, Louisiana College

150

February 27, 2014 – Brown Bag Lunch with Lecture at the Old State House Museum      “An Eagle on His Button.” In the spring of 1863, black troops were being recruited by the Federal forces. Join Mark Christ for lunch as he discusses the role of the African American Soldier in the Civil War. Christ is the Community Outreach Director for the Arkansas Historic

March 22, 2014  On the Road with Ed Bearss – Tour of Camden Expedition Sites Sponsored by the MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History and the Arkansas Sesquicentennial commission. This event is sold out. Call the museum at 501-376-4602 to be added to the waiting list. Cost $35.

April 7, 2014 – April 12, 2014      Red River Campaign-Camden Expedition                     This event will include a 25 mile march through historic Washington and onto Prairie D’Ane, where there will be a battle reenactment on April 12th.  Additional information will be available closer to the date of the event. Call 409-762-2323

April 14, 2014 to April 19, 2014                                                                                               150th Anniversary of the Occupation of Camden and Reenactment of the Battle of Poison Springs                                                                                                                                         Sponsored by the Ouachita County Historical Society                                                              Mark your calendars for this week. Included will be occupation of Camden complete with tours, lectures, and exhibits during the week.  All events will be free. Call 870-818-3565 for details.

Monday,  April 14 at 6:30 p.m. Letters and Memoirs of the Civil War on the outdoor stage at Historic Postmaster’s Grill. Experiences of the inhabitants of Camden during the War will be shared.

Friday, April 18 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Occupation of Camden. Troops will be camped on Washington Street near homes that were occupied during the war. Re-enactors will tell the stories of families who lived through the occupation.

Friday, April 18 – Free showing of the of the movie “Glory” at 6:30 at SAU Tech’s Ross Center

Saturday, April 19 – Battle of Poison Spring 2:00 p.m. at Poison Spring State Park in Chidester

Saturday, April 19 – Closing ceremony at 6:30 p.m. at Coleman Stadium. It will include choirs presenting period music and a commemoration of the soldiers who lost their lives at the Battle of Poison Spring.

April 19, 2014 – Annual Confederate Heritage/Flag/Memorial Day on the NE corner of the Arkansas Capital Grounds in Little Rock at 11:00 A.M. For details call Danny Honnoll, Chief of Staff, Arkansas Division at 870-926-2985

May 10, 2014   Fort Lincoln Freedom Fest    In DeValls Bluff

Sponsored by the Arnold Family Foundation and the Delta Cultural Center                             Make plans to attend this annual event which is complete with artillery and infantry demonstrations, educational projects, and tours of the original fortifications in DeValls Bluff. The event is free and will be held at the DeValls Bluff Community Center.                               Call 870-998-2005 for additional information.

Donna Ludlow, Business Manager with the Arkansas Historical Association invites everyone to the annual conference. The AHA’s annual conference at Historic Washington State Park is coming up, April 3-5. Emphasis will be on the Civil War and the Home Front. Members will soon receive their program and registration materials in the mail. But those eager to begin their planning for the meeting can view the program and print out the registration form at the Association’s website (www.arkansashistoricalassociation.org). Just go to the annual conference page. For additional information visit the web site or call Donna at 479-575-5885

Fort Steele Marker Dedication

Saturday, March 29

Plans are underway for the dedication of the Fort Steele Sesquicentennial Marker in Little Rock. The dedication will be held at 10:30 am. on the corner of Gaines and 16th Street. Thanks to the Gaines Street Baptist Church for granting permission to place this marker on their property. Following the dedication, join us for lunch in Little Rock. Our Roundtable sponsored the marker. The Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission hopes to have at least one marker in each of the 75 counties.

Trust

 

 

From the Civil War Trust:

 

The Civil War Battlefield Preservation Program

(CWBPP) is a matching grants program that promotes preservation of America’s most historically significant Civil War battlegrounds. The program, funded through the federal side

of the Land and Water Conservation Fund, encourages nonprofit involvement in

historic preservation. The program is the result of a commission created by Congress that recommended the establishment of a matching grants program to protect high priority Civil War

battlefields. The program was formally authorized in December 2002, when President

George W. Bush signed into law the Civil War Battlefield Preservation Act. The program was reauthorized in March 2009, when President Barack Obama signed into law the Omnibus Public Land Act (PL 111-11). The program is authorized for up to $10 million a year.

 

Civil War Battlefield Preservation Program grants are administered by the American Battlefield Protection Program, an arm of the National Park Service (NPS), which awards all congressional appropriations as competitive grants. Because only a small percentage of America’s Civil War battlefields are preserved within the Park Service, CWBPP is used to target only hallowed ground outside NPS boundaries (and thus does not contribute to NPS maintenance costs).

The key to the program’s success is a 1-to-1 federal/nonfederal matching grants formula that encourages both public and private sector investment in battlefield protection. The program preserves historic sites by working with willing sellers to acquire properties at fair

market value when they become available. CWBPP matching grants can be used for both fee simple and easement acquisition.

 

Over the years, CWBPP grants have been used to save more than 19,500 acres of hallowed ground in 20 states. Among the sites saved as a result of this program are historic properties at Antietam and South Mountain, Md.; Champion Hill, Miss.; Chancellorsville, Manassas and the Wilderness, Va.; Chattanooga and Fort Donelson, Tenn.; and Harpers Ferry, W.Va.

 

Since FY 1999, Congress has appropriated $74 million for CWBPP. Most recently, Congress included $9 million for the program in the FY 2014 Consolidated Appropriations Act (H.R. 3547). The White House included an $8.9 million request for the American Battlefield Protection Program, which includes CWBPP, as part of its FY 2014 budget, released on April 10, 2013.

 

 

 

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, Inc

2014 Membership Dues

 

Membership dues for 2014 are to be paid now.  These monies help to pay for the transportation and lodging cost of our speakers.  Printing cost for our newsletter and brochures we have at various locations in Central Arkansas are also supported by your dues.  In addition, monies are used for the wayside signs for the Campaign for Little Rock that the CWRT of Arkansas purchases and maintains.

 

Additional monetary gifts that you make will be used for preservation efforts for Civil War battlefields and places of historical importance related to the Civil War.

 

2014 Membership Dues Statement

$20 per year, Please make checks payable to:

The Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, Inc

(Please disregard this notice if dues have already been paid)

Name

Address                                               City                             State                Zip Code

Phone                                                  e-mail address

 

Membership dues………………………………….$20

Additional $$ for preservation……………………..

 

Total                                                                    _______

 

Mail to:

Brian Brown, Treasurer

The Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, Inc.

C/O Brian Brown

101 S. Spring Street, Ste 300

L.R. Ark 72201

 

Or pay online at our website: www.civilwar buff.org

Questions: call Brian at 501-376-2981

This Week in the Civil War

Courtesy Civil War Trust

 

February 25     1862: US War Department seizes control of all telegraph lines

February 26     1863: Cherokee Indian National Council leaves the Confederacy for the Union

February 27     1864: A new camp for Federal prisoners of war opens near Andersonville, GA

February 28     1864: USA Gen. Hugh Kilpatrick’s cavalry raid on Richmond, VA begins

 

Civil War Roundtable Speakers for 2014

 

January            Drew Hodges              History professor, A.P. Hill

February          Donna Bentley            Jacksonport State Park Interpreter, The Gunboat Maurepas

March              George Lankford        Professor Emeritus Lyon College, Slavery

April                Shawn Fisher              History Professor Harding, The Spencer Rifle

May                 Mark Christ                 Community Outreach Director, J.O. Shelby’s Summer ‘64

June                 Philip McMath            Attorney, David O. Dodd

July                  Tom DeBlack              Professor at Arkansas Tech, Conditions on the Home front

 

Thank you Drew Hodges for his program on A.P. Hill We hope to see you Tuesday with Donna Bentley and the Maurepas.

 

 

 

 

 

Ed Bearss – 1994

February 10, 2014

Attached are pages of a  transcript of the speech made by Ed Bearss in Little Rock (at OSH) when he was here in 1994 for his bus tours on the Little Rock campaign and the Camden expedition.  Clicking on the thumbnails will take you to larger readable versions.

 

 

Soon to Be Our 50th Year!
FOR THE MEETING TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2014

Meets Fourth Tuesday; January-November
Founded March 1964

Second Presbyterian Church

600 Pleasant Valley Drive

Little Rock 
Program at 7 p.m. 
Online:  www.civilwarbuff.org
Jan Sarna, President 

Rick Meadows, Editor 

Roundtable

RMeadows@aaamissouri.com / arcivilwarbuff@gmail.com 
Dues $20 Per Year
VISITORS WELCOME!
WHILE YOU CAN

 VISIT THE BATTLEFIELDS WHEN YOU CAN…

 

“General A.P. Hill”

With

Drew Hodges

1

Join us Tuesday when Drew Hodges brings our program on Confederate General A. P. Hill.
Hodges received his undergraduate degree at the University of Oklahoma with a major in history. At the University of Central Arkansas, Hodges received his Masters in History. For the past 6 years, Hodges has taught at National Park Community College in Hot Springs, UALR and ASU Beebe.
Each summer Hodges attends Alumni College at Washington & Lee in Lexington, VA, studying various history subjects taught by Pulitzer Prize winners. In addition to teaching, Hodges serves as President and program chairman for the NLR roundtable. He is also a founding member of the Albert Pike Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp in El Reno, Ok.
Material for his talk is based on information gained at his summer sabbaticals to Lexington, VA. A.P. Hill was a student at West Point with his future commander, Thomas J. Jackson. They didn’t get along before the war and they relationship deteriorated even further during the war. Hodges will discuss the friction between the two Generals. Perhaps Hill is most famous for his action at Sharpsburg (Antietam). His division was left behind at Harpers Ferry dealing with new Federal prisoners while Lee and Jackson met the Army of the Potomac. Late in the day Hill forced marched his men 14 miles to repulse Ambrose Burnside who had crossed the bridge over the creek and was about to turn the Confederate right flank. Each year during the re-enactment at Antietam, one can see 21st Century Gray uniforms retracing Hill’s march over the hills of western Maryland. Just before Robert E. Lee died, his last words were: “Tell Hill he must come up, Strike the tent.”
Join us Tuesday as Hodges shares with us about this Confederate General, A.P. Hill.

150

 

 

January 29, 2014 – Brown Bag with Lunch Lecture at the Old State House Museum Dr. Carl Moneyhon will discuss the 1864 Constitutional Convention. The 1864 State Constitution was written 150 years ago this month at the Old State House. Dr. Moneyhon is a history professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Participants are welcome to bring their lunch. Soft drinks and water will be provided. The event is free. For additional call the museum at 501-324-9685.

February 27, 2014 – Brown Bag Lunch with Lecture at the Old State House Museum “An Eagle on His Button.” In the spring of 1863, black troops were being recruited by the Federal forces. Join Mark Christ for lunch as he discusses the role of the African American Soldier in the Civil War. Christ is the Community Outreach Director for the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program.

March 22, 2014 On the Road with Ed Bearss

Ed Bears - 1863 Little Rock Campaign Tour -110

Saturday, March 22, 2014
Tour of Camden Expedition Sites

Sponsored by the MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History
and the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission
503 E. 9th Street, Little Rock, AR
Call the museum to register 501-376-4602
Tour departs the museum at 8:00 A.M.
Cost $35
Price includes sit-down lunch at the historic McCollum-Chidester House in Camden

April 7, 2014 – April 12, 2014 Red River Campaign-Camden Expedition
This event will include a 25 mile march through historic Washington and onto Prairie D’Ane, where there will be a battle reenactment on April 12th. Additional information will be available closer to the date of the event. Call 409-762-2323
_____________________________________________________________________________
April 14, 2014 to April 19, 2014 Reenactment of the Battle of Poison Springs Sponsored by the Ouachita County Historical Society
Mark your calendars for this week. Included will be occupation of Camden complete with tours, lectures, and exhibits during the week. More information will follow. All events will be free. Call 870-818-3565 for details.

April 19, 2014 – Annual Confederate Heritage/Flag/Memorial Day on the NE corner of the Arkansas Capital Grounds in Little Rock at 11:00 A.M. For details call Danny Honnoll, Chief of Staff, Arkansas Division at 870-926-2985

May 10, 2014 Fort Lincoln Freedom Fest In DeValls Bluff
Sponsored by the Arnold Family Foundation and the Delta Cultural Center Make plans to attend this annual event which is complete with artillery and infantry demonstrations, educational projects, and tours of the original fortifications in DeValls Bluff. The event is free and will be held at the DeValls Bluff Community Center. Call 870-998-2005 for additional information.
Civil War Bullets from Rick

• Are you heading south for the winter? George Furis, newsletter editor for The Civil War Round Table of Central Florida, invites you to attend the Annual Reenactment of the Battle of Olustee or Ocean Pond at the Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park, Florida. The event will be held February 14-16. Admission is $10 for adults.

• War Comes To Georgia: The 150th Anniversary of the Atlanta Campaign: Ringgold Through Kennesaw – March 27th-30th, 2014 Our friend Greg Biggs has sent this invitation to join them. It is tour time again and this one will feature four days of the Atlanta Campaign, the pivotal action that secured the re-election of Abraham Lincoln in November 1864. We will depart Franklin, TN on Thursday, March 27th and return there on Sunday afternoon, March 30th. Travel where nearly 200,000 men fought for 4 1/2 months at famous places like Resaca, Dalton, Pickett’s Mill, New Hope Church and Kennesaw Mountain. Also included are various sites of the famous Great Locomotive Chase of 1862.
What do you get for the tour fee? Four days of tours with Greg Biggs and Thomas Cartwright. Greg, president of the Clarksville TN Civil War Roundtable, grew up in Georgia and has led Atlanta tours since 1993. Thomas is a well-known tour guide and historian who is the expert on the Middle Tennessee Campaign of 1864. He has also appeared on Civil War television programs and various documentaries. Three nights of hotels – Hampton Inn (Ringgold, GA, one night and Marietta, GA, two nights). These have free breakfasts each day. Cavalier Tours escort services who will handle almost everything you need for the tour including your luggage. The tour will be on a bus company coach who works with Cavalier on a regular basis. Admission fees to the Tunnel Hill Civil War and Railroad Museum; the Southern Museum for Civil War and Locomotive History and the Pickett’s Mill State Battlefield Park (which is one of the most pristine battlefields in America). A complete set of tour maps for each battlefield. There will also be a Wednesday night program (March 26th) in Franklin with a lecture on the Atlanta Campaign to orient you on what we will be touring.

Tour rates – Single person per room – $495
Double per room – $390 each
Triple per room – $360 each
To pay by credit card or debit card – call the Lotz House at (615) 790-7190. All you have to do is say that you are registering and paying for the “War In Georgia: The 150th Anniversary of the Atlanta Campaign tour.” They will take your name, address, phone number, card info and email address. Please be sure to inform them of how many are attending – single, double, triple. You will receive an email confirmation. If you do not have email then give them your phone number in its place.

Trust

News Release: CONGRESS ALLOCATES $8.9 MILLION FOR FEDERAL GRANTS TO PROTECT CIVIL WAR BATTLEFIELDS
Civil War Trust applauds lawmakers for their support of program that has helped protect more than 19,000 acres of hallowed ground throughout the nation

(Washington, D.C.) – The Civil War Trust today applauded the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives for including $8.9 million for the Civil War Battlefield Preservation Program in the Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 Consolidated Appropriations Act. The program, which provides federal matching grants to protect historically significant battlefield land outside National Park Service boundaries, has been used to protect more than 19,000 acres of hallowed ground in 16 states.

“This is tremendous news that could not come at a more critical time,” remarked Civil War Trust president James Lighthizer.  “Over the past decade, development pressure on unprotected but historically significant battlefield land has only increased.  These grants will be matched with private sector donations to preserve thousands of acres of historic land that would otherwise be lost forever.”

Since Congress first authorized it in 2002, the Civil War Battlefield Preservation Program has enjoyed broad, bipartisan support in both the House and Senate. The program is considered a model for cooperative partnerships between the National Park Service (NPS), state and local governments, and the private sector. Its matching grants formula encourages nonprofit groups to invest in acquisition of battlefield lands from willing sellers. Grants from the program are awarded by the American Battlefield Protection Program, an arm of NPS.
Among the sites saved as a result of this innovative grants program are historic properties at Antietam and South Mountain, Md.; Gettysburg, Pa.; Vicksburg and Champion Hill, Miss.; Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg and Manassas, Va.; Shiloh, Chattanooga and Fort Donelson, Tenn.; Harpers Ferry, W.Va.; and other battlefields.
In addition to funding for the Civil War Battlefield Preservation Program, the FY 2014 Consolidated Appropriations Act includes $5.5 million for acquiring inholdings at Civil War battlefield national parks. Inholdings result from private ownership of lands prior to the designation of the protected park, which then end up grandfathered within the legally designated boundary. Thousands of acres of inholdings exist at Civil War battlefields maintained within the National Park System.

“Preserved Civil War battlefields are living monuments – not just to the men in blue and gray who fought there – but to all of America’s veterans,” Lighthizer said. “They serve as outdoor classrooms, teaching young and old alike about the sacrifices made to forge the nation we are today.”
The FY2014 Consolidated Appropriations Act was passed earlier this week by healthy majorities in both the House and Senate. President Barack Obama is expected to sign the bill into law over the weekend.

What Historic Civil War sites in Arkansas will receive funding? Call your legislator.

Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, Inc

2014 Membership Dues

 

Membership dues for 2014 are to be paid now.  These monies help to pay for the transportation and lodging cost of our speakers.  Printing cost for our newsletter and brochures we have at various locations in Central Arkansas are also supported by your dues.  In addition, monies are used for the wayside signs for the Campaign for Little Rock that the CWRT of Arkansas purchases and maintains.

 

Additional monetary gifts that you make will be used for preservation efforts for Civil War battlefields and places of historical importance related to the Civil War.

 

2014 Membership Dues Statement

$20 per year, Please make checks payable to:

The Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, Inc

(Please disregard this notice if dues have already been paid) 

 

Name

Address                                               City                             State                Zip Code 

Phone                                                  e-mail address

 

Membership dues………………………………….$20

Additional $$ for preservation……………………..

 

Total                                                                    _______

Mail to:

Brian Brown, Treasurer

The Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, Inc.

C/O Brian Brown

101 S. Spring Street, Ste 300

L.R. Ark 72201

 

Or pay online at our website: www.civilwar buff.org

Questions: call Brian at 501-376-2981

Officers who will lead our Corps this Campaign

 

President – Jan Sarna

Vice President- Dick Brannon

Secretary – Rick Meadows

Treasurer – Brian Brown

Web Master – Pris Weathers

Newsletter Editor – Rick Meadows

At Large Member of Board – Don Hamilton

Publicity – Art Maune 

This Week in the Civil War

Courtesy Civil War Trust

 

January 26       1861: Louisiana secedes from the Union

January 27       1862: President Lincoln issues War Order #1 ordering all forces to advance                              (Southerners call this the War of Northern Aggression)

January 28       1864: Operations around New Bern, N.C.

January 29       1861: Kansas is admitted as a state with a Constitution prohibiting slavery

January 30       1862: USS Monitor launched at Greenpoint, Long Island, N.Y.

January 31       1865: Congress passes the 13th Amendment, abolishing slavery throughout the US

 

Civil War Roundtable Speakers for 2014

 

January            Drew Hodges              History professor, A.P. Hill

February          Donna Bentley            Jacksonport State Park Interpreter, The Gunboat Maurepas

March              George Lankford        Professor Emeritus Lyon College, Slavery

April                Shawn Fisher              History Professor Harding, The Spencer Rifle

May                 Mark Christ                 Community Outreach Director, J.O. Shelby’s Summer ‘64

June                 Philip McMath            Attorney, David O. Dodd 

 

Thank you Rev. Dyer for his program on Robert Lewis Dabney, Chief of Staff for Stonewall Jackson” We hope to see you Tuesday with Drew Hodges and A.P Hill. 

In Memoriam: Dr. C. Fred Williams

1
NOVEMBER 25, 2013

Dr. C. Fred Williams, 69, of Little Rock, UALR history professor (1971-2011) and author, was born December 24, 1943, in Allen, Oklahoma, and passed away November 23, 2013.

He was predeceased by his parents, Charles and Willie Mae Williams, and his first wife, Glenda Belcher Williams. Survivors include his wife, Janet Hamm Williams; daughters, Laura Beth Chelf (Phil) of Southlake, TX, and Libby Lee (Scott) of North Little Rock; son, Brad Williams of Little Rock; five grandsons, Andy and Zachary Chelf, Tag Grace, Walker Williams, and Vann Lee; two brothers, Dr. Burtis Williams (Linda) of Abilene, TX, and Dr. Curtis Williams (Norma) of Stuttgart; five sisters, Shirley Abney, Phyllis Joiner (Gary), Ginger Grant, and Rita Vandergriff, all of Ada, OK, and Becky Schutte (Don) of Hooks, TX; many nieces, nephews, cousins and treasured friends.

Dr. Williams was a graduate of Murray State in Tishomingo, OK; East Central University, Ada, OK; Wichita State University; and the University of Oklahoma. He was a member of Calvary Baptist Church, Little Rock; West Little Rock Rotary; Arkansas Historical Association; Agricultural History Society; AACHT; and the Southern History Assocation. He was also among conference leaders at LifeQuest, and volunteered in Little Rock Public Schools.

Visitation will be at 5:00 – 7:00 P.M., Tuesday, November 26, 2013 at Roller-Chenal Funeral Home,13801 Chenal Parkway, Little Rock, AR 72211 (501)224-8300. The funeral will be 10:00 A.M., Wednesday, November 27, 2013 at Calvary Baptist Church, 5700 Cantrell Road, Little Rock, followed by interment at Pinecrest Cemetery.

Memorials may be made to the C.F. Williams Scholarship Endowment, UALR Development, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204.

Our 49th Year
FOR THE MEETING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2013

Meets Fourth Tuesday; January-November
Founded March 1964

Second Presbyterian Church

600 Pleasant Valley Drive

Little Rock 
Program at 7 p.m. 
Online:  www.civilwarbuff.org
Jan Sarna, President 

Rick Meadows, Editor 

Roundtable

RMeadows@aaamissouri.com / arcivilwarbuff@gmail.com 
Dues $20 Per Year
VISITORS WELCOME!
WHILE YOU CAN

 VISIT THE BATTLEFIELDS WHEN YOU CAN…

 

“Robert Lewis Dabney, Chief of Staff for Stonewall Jackson”

 

With Rev. David Dyer

1

Join us Tuesday when Rev Dyer brings our program on Robert Lewis Dabney. Born in 1820, Dabney was a Presbyterian pastor serving first as chaplain of the 18th Virginia Infantry and later Chief of Staff to Jackson in the Valley Campaign and the Seven Days Battles. Dabney is famous for his work: Life and Campaigns of Lieut-General Thomas J. Jackson in 1866. The original edition can be purchased today for $300.  For those not wishing to invest such a sum, a 2002 hardcover reprint can be obtained for only $12. Rev Dyer is a retired Presbyterian minister from Little Rock, and he brings a unique understanding of the life of a chaplain during the Civil War.

150

December 7 – December 8    Christmas Open House at Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park

Christmas will be in the air as in the days of the Civil War at Prairie Grove Battlefield. While food is cooking in the Latta House kitchen, members of the local Wool & Wheel Handspinners Guild & the Dogwood Lace groups will be demonstrating spinning, weaving, and lace making. There will be guided tours through the historic Latta and Morrow houses. Various military drills, camp life, and other living history activities will be included throughout the weekend at various times and locations.

Meeting place: Hindman Hall Visitor Center – 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

 

Admission: Free, Presented by volunteers & NW 15th Ark Infantry.

For additional information call 479-846-2990 or prairiegrove@arkansas.com

______________________________________________________________________________                                                                                               

April 7, 2014 – April 12, 2014      Red River Campaign-Camden Expedition

This event will include a 25 mile march through historic Washington and onto Prairie D’Ane, where there will be a battle reenactment on April 12th.  Additional information will be available closer to the date of the event. Call 409-762-2323

_____________________________________________________________________________

April 14, 2014 to April 19, 2014          Reenactment of the Battle of Poison Springs                         Sponsored by the Ouachita County Historical Society

Mark your calendars for this week. Included will be occupation of Camden complete with tours, lectures, and exhibits during the week. More information will follow. All events will be free. Call 870-818-3565 for details.

May 10, 2014   Fort Lincoln Freedom Fest    In DeValls Bluff

Sponsored by the Arnold Family Foundation and the Delta Cultural Center                             Make plans to attend this annual event which is complete with artillery and infantry demonstrations, educational projects, and tours of the original fortifications in DeValls Bluff. The event is free and will be held at the DeValls Bluff Community Center.

Call 870-998-2005 for additional information.

Roundtable member turns author and poet.

Vernon Dutton, a member of our Roundtable recently spoke to the Grand Prairie Civil War Roundtable in Lonoke about the 3rd Arkansas at Antietam. After the meeting, Vernon discussed his new work, Civil War Reflections. When I returned home from the meeting and started turning through the pages, I could not put my copy down. What an addition to anyone’s reading!         Your editor.

2

“I became reactivated in history and specifically became interested in the Battle Antietam while viewing Ken Burns; documentary, “The Civil War,” on PBS in 1990. The following year I took two days off from work and drove to Shiloh National Battlefield, located about 125 miles due east of Memphis, to view a living history demonstration performed by a Confederate brigade that included infantry, cavalry and artillery.”

“I have been a civil war buff since the age of twelve. Like most history buffs, I read books on Civil War generals and was awed by their leadership, their dynamic personalities and the pride they instilled in their commands.” Vernon Dutton
“Civil War Reflections, Honoring the Battles, Soldiers and Spirits, published in 2012 by Time Travelers Publishing is collection of photos and photos. Many books have told the story of the Civil War, but none have put the reader inside the action with the vivid imagery and heart-wrenching reality of Civil War Reflections. For the first time, feel the emotion of the soldiers who risked their lives for their country – and understand the trials, triumphs and tragedies they shared upon their journey.” the publisher.
This work has many wonderful photographs from Shiloh by Cindy Baldhoff and from Gettysburg and Antietam by Nancy Dutton.
Contact Dutton at 501-902-8800 or visit vdutton.com for your copy

3

 

Charles O Durnett
The Arkansas Historical Association announces the Charles O. Durnett Award competition for 2014. Entries must be postmarked no later than February 1, 2014 to be eligible. This award has been endowed by the Arkansas Civil War Heritage Trails Foundation, Inc. as a tribute to the late Charles O. Durnett, the chairman of the Central Arkansas Civil War Heritage Trail and a member of the Arkansas Civil Was Sesquicentennial Commission. It recognized his dedication to the study of Civil War history – whether military, social, economic, or cultural. Entries should be based, at least in part, on original research in primary sources. They must not have been submitted elsewhere or published previously. Send entries to: Arkansas Historical Association, Department of History, Old Main 416, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701.

trust

 

Civil War Trust Announces Preservation Victories during Tennessee Sesquicentennial Signature Event
The Civil War Trust announces completion of $1.4 million campaign to save land at Chickamauga and Chattanooga NMP, thanks to Tennessee for creation of new grant program for battlefield preservation. (Chattanooga, Tenn.) – As part of the Tennessee Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission’s annual signature event in downtown Chattanooga, the Civil War Trust recently announced the successful completion of a $1.4 million fundraising campaign to protect 109 acres of battlefield land associated with Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park (NMP). The newly preserved land is located at historic Reed’s Bridge, site of the opening salvo of the battle of Chickamauga.

SEE YOU TUESDAY WITH ROBERT LEWIS DABNEY AND REV DYER!

Our 49th Year
FOR THE MEETING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2013
Meets Fourth Tuesday; January-November
Founded March 1964

Second Presbyterian Church

600 Pleasant Valley Drive

Little Rock
Program at 7 p.m.
Online:  www.civilwarbuff.org
Jan Sarna, President

Rick Meadows, Editor

Roundtable

RMeadows@aaamissouri.com / arcivilwarbuff@gmail.com
Dues $20 Per Year
VISITORS WELCOME!
WHILE YOU CAN
VISIT THE BATTLEFIELDS WHEN YOU CAN…

“Old Washington in the War”

With Josh Williams

Josh

Join us Tuesday when Josh Williams joins us to discuss Washington in the Civil War.

Williams is the Curator of Historic Washington State Park. He has worked at the park since 2006, beginning as the Park Historian. He received his B.A. in History from John Brown University, a M.A. in History from Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, and a MLIS degree with an archival emphasis from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He currently serves on the boards of the Arkansas Museum Association and the Arkansas Historical Association. He also is a member of the Arkansas Living History Association. He is a member of the Washington Methodist Church and dance caller for the Washington Vintage Dancers. He and his wife Jaimie have one daughter that just turned 1 year old named Naomi Grace Williams. Williams will also give us an update on the upcoming events at Washington, including Civil War Weekend on November 2-3.

Historic Washington State Park is located 9 miles northwest of Hope on U.S. Hwy 278. Take exit #30 of I-30 at Hope. For details on the Civil War Weekend, call 870-983-2684 or visit HistoricWashington@Arkansas.com

trust

 

The Civil War Trust has partnered with the Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield Foundation to protect 60 acres on a ridge overlooking the battlefield.  Union troops moved off the bluff and through the property to a low water ford. This tract was also the site of Col. Franz Sigel’s Union artillery battery.  To date, The Trust has protected 272 acres at Wilson’s Creek.

 

 

The Trust is also working to purchase Hollowed Ground in the following historic sites in the Antietam Campaign:

 

Battlefield # Acres Cost Matching Funds Trust Portion

Harpers Ferry       4.0 $   715,000 $  710,000 $     5,000

South Mountain             298.0 $1,095,000 $1,095,000 $     5,000

Antietam     15.0     305,000 $   152,500                  $152,500

Shepherdstown                     .6                  70,000              35,000            $   35,000

Total   317.6 $2,190,000       $1,992,500                  $197,500

 

According to Jim Lighthizer, President of the Trust, “Through a combination of state and federal matching grants, a very generous anonymous donor, and some crucial funding from the National. Park Service, these sites can be preserved for only $197, 500.

 

The property we are saving at Antietam was a significant Confederate artillery site, and saw crucial troop movements throughout the entire battle. It offers excellent direct views to most of the major landmarks of the battle, and must be preserved before it can be purchased by a developer and subdivided into home sites.” The 3rd Arkansas was at Antietam.

News from Greg Biggs in Tennessee

The Tennessee Valley CWRT Civil War Symposium – November 2, 2013

Join the Tennessee Valley Civil War Round Table and the Huntsville-Madison County Public Library at the Huntsville, Madison County Library in Huntsville, Alabama. Featured speakers are:

  • Greg Biggs – “Nashville – Siren’s Song of the Confederacy”

  • Thomas Flagel – “A Landscape Transformed: Union Fortifications and the Alteration of Middle Tennessee”

  • Eric Jacobsen – “The Battle of Franklin”

  • J.F. Sparks – “The Federal Occupation of North Alabama in 1862”

  • Peggy Allen Towns – “Dully Driven: The Plight of North Alabama’s African Americans”

150

 

Thursday, October 24, 2013 Arkansas Tech University presents:
Dr. Steven E. Woodworth, Doc Bryan Lecture Hall – 6 P.M.
Dr. Steven E. Woodworth, acclaimed Civil War historian, will be presenting the David Krueger Lecture at Arkansas Tech University on Thursday evening, October 24, in the Doc Bryan Lecture Hall at 6 p.m. Dr. Woodworth’s talk is “’While God is Marching On’: The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers.” The lecture is free and open to the public. For additional information call 479-968-0237 or tdeblack@atu.edu.

Friday, October 25, 2013 Old State House presents:
Brown Bag Lecture Series: Noon – 1 p.m.

Mark Christ of the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission will discuss “The Battle of Pine Bluff.”

“The Battle of Pine Bluff” – For the Arkansas Confederacy, 1863 was an unmitigated disaster, with battles lost at Arkansas Post and Helena and the Union gaining control of the Arkansas River Valley. On October 25, 1863, Brig. Gen. John Sappington Marmaduke sought to reverse Confederate fortunes by attacking the small Union garrison at Pine Bluff. Col. Powell Clayton and the tough Fifth Kansas and First Indiana Cavalry Regiments, assisted by newly freed African Americans in camps around Pine Bluff, met the attack in one of the few Arkansas battles fought in an urban setting.
Admission to Brown Bag Lunch Lectures is free. Participants are encouraged to
bring a sack lunch; beverages are provided. For additional information call 501-324-9685 or info@oldstatehouse.org
October 5 til October 26, 2013 DeValls Bluff Museum presents:
African American Legislators

Featured will be local artifacts at the DeValls Bluff Museum and an exhibit on African American Legislators. The exhibit is sponsored by the Arkansas History Commission.
For additional information call 870-256-5171.

Saturday, October 26, 2013 – Battle of Pine Bluff from 10 A.M. to 4:00 the public is invited to come to downtown Pine Bluff for walking tours, children’s activities, and living historians along with Civil War re-enactors. At 4:30 a Symposium will be held at the Harbor Oaks Golf Club and Restaurant in Pine Bluff. Featured speakers are Mark Christ, Marion Glover, and Ronnie Nichols.
For additional information call 870-543-1820, ext227 or visit www.facebook.com/BashonBarraque

 

Reed’s Bridge Jacksonville

Funds are being sought for the purchase of 5 acres of land south of the core battlefield on Hwy 161. The land is at the site of the Confederate Artillery Position on the battle that occurred on August 27, 1863. Cost of the land is about $150,000. One half of this amount has been pledged.
Fort Steele Marker

The Arkansas Sesquicentennial Commission has approved the marker that our Roundtable is funding. It will be located at 15th and Gaines Streets in Little Rock. Fort Steele was constructed after Little Rock fell on September 10, 1863. It guarded the southwest approach to the city. Dedication will follow.
Camp Nelson Event – Huge Success

Local Historian R.D. Keever dressed in his Civil War Uniform and set his tent with rope bed at Camp Nelson on Saturday, October 12. Keever also brought his horse “Sammy” with Civil War era tact. Keever displayed his collection of artifacts. In addition, he played the recent recording of “Root Hog or Die” that was done with period instruments. S.T. Rister of the 17th Texas Infantry started a colored drawing of Camp Nelson. Later in 1862 he added lyrics to the drawing. Keever played a recording of the song. Credit for this project is given to the Arkansas History Commission for being the caregiver of the drawing and poem.
R.D Keever with guests at Camp Nelson Confederate Cemetery

Civil War Roundtable Speakers 2013

Mark and Joe are participating in a prisoner exchange.
Joe will be our speaker in June, Mark in July!

January – William Shea – History Professor at the University of Arkansas at Monticello – Samuel Curtis: The Man Who Conquered Arkansas
February – Stuart Towns – Retired professor and author from Forrest City – Enduring Legacy: Rhetoric and Ritual of the Lost Cause
March – Lorien Foote – History Professor at the University of Central Arkansas – Trails of Blood: Escaping the Confederacy
April – Dr. Paul Haynie – History Professor at Harding University – 7 Most Important Shots fired in the Civil War.
May – Brian Brown – Local historian – The Saps at the Battle of Vicksburg
June – Mark Christ – Community Outreach Director, Arkansas Historic Preservation Program – Skirmish at Paroquet Bluff
July – Joseph Herron – Parker Ranger – The Battle of Arkansas Post
August – Conway Women’s Choir – Period Music
September – Aaron Barnhart- Author from Kansas City – The Big Divide: A Travel Guide to Historic and Civil War Sites in the Missouri-Kansas Border Region
October – Josh Williams , Curator at Old Washington State Park – Old Washington in the War
November – Rev. David Dyer, Pastor – Robert Lewis Dabney, Chief of Staff for Stonewall Jackson

Thank you to Aaron Barnhart and Diane Eichhoff who brought our program on the historical sites in Kansas and Missouri last month! We hope to see you Tuesday with Josh Williams.

 

 

Unfurl the Banner – Ebook

October 19, 2013
1
Twelve poems from Godey’s Lady’s Book, one of the most popular publications of the nineteenth century have been republished by Deborah Halliday. These poems have not previously been collected and two were written by a Union soldier; another, the last poem in the volume, is an interesting one – it seems to imply that the South should keep up the fight. 
The collection is titled “Unfurl the Banner, Strew the Flowers” and is available on Amazon Kindle for 99 cents.  The link is below. 
http://www.amazon.com/Unfurl-Banner-Strew-Flowers-ebook/dp/B00F78B2IO/ref=sr_1_4?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1380758604&sr=1-4&keywords=Deborah+L+Halliday

Our 49th Year
FOR THE MEETING TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013

Meets Fourth Tuesday; January-November
Founded March 1964

Second Presbyterian Church

600 Pleasant Valley Drive

Little Rock 
Program at 7 p.m. 
Online:  www.civilwarbuff.org
Jan Sarna, President 

Rick Meadows, Editor 

Roundtable

RMeadows@aaamissouri.com / arcivilwarbuff@gmail.com 
Dues $20 Per Year
VISITORS WELCOME!
WHILE YOU CAN

 VISIT THE BATTLEFIELDS WHEN YOU CAN…

 

 “Big Divide”

With Aaron Barnhart and Diane Eichkhoff

 

Join us Tuesday when Diane and Aaron join us to discuss their new book: The Big Divide: A Travel Guide to Historic and Civil War Sites in the Missouri-Kansas Border Region. Diane Eickhoff is a textbook editor turned historian. Her first book was Revolutionary Heart: The Life of Clarina Nichols and the Pioneering Crusade for Women’s Rights. She lectures for the Kansas Humanities Council.

Aaron Barnhart is the former TV and media critic for the Kansas City Star. He has contributed to the New York Times, Village Voice, CNN’s Reliable Sources, MSNBC’s Hardball, and Macworld. They have also co-authored stories for the New York Times’ ”Disunion” project. They are currently collaborating on a nonfiction narrative set in 1850s Kansas. Sixteen years ago they moved from Chicago. Today they live in Kansas City, Missouri — two blocks east of the Missouri-Kansas state line.

Big

 

Diane Eickhoff states that “the Missouri-Kansas border became the defining line for both Native American policy and for determining the future of slavery in this country. Who would own the land? Who would work it? I can’t imagine anything more consequential.”

In an interview with the Civil War Trust:

Civil War Trust: Exactly how important was this region to the Civil War and why? 

Diane Eickhoff: “Out here we say that this region — not South Carolina — is where the Civil War really began. The seven-year Bleeding Kansas-era was a testing ground for the larger conflict and the bloody prelude to four hard years of all-out war. The Missouri-Kansas border was the place where compromise ended and both sides took their stand. When the larger war erupted it was unclear whether Missouri would stay with the Union. Her governor-turned-general might have succeeded in winning Missouri for the Confederacy had the leadership in Richmond supported his gains and held fast. For the Union, control of Missouri was imperative. With its large population, enormous natural resources, and — especially — access to and control of the Mississippi River, Missouri was critical to Union control of the region.”

Civil War Trust:

Which sites would you suggest a Civil War enthusiast visit first and why?

canon

Cannons at Wilson’s Creek (Rob Shenk)

Aaron Barnhart: I’d recommend making a beeline to southwest Missouri, around Springfield. Two of the nation’s 45 “Class A” battlefields are there, including Pea Ridge, just across the state line in Arkansas, where the Union Army wrested control of Missouri essentially for the rest of the war in 1862.

Wilson’s Creek, where the only major battle of 1861 besides First Manassas was fought, is a beautifully restored battlefield. And then just a short drive away is a terrific site that’s just emerging thanks to preservation efforts, at Newtonia, Mo. Ed Bearss has been a champion of Newtonia for years. It’s one of the few battles where opposing Indian regiments fought each other.

Civil War Trust: As interpretation of these sites continues, are there any new discoveries that have been revealed?

Diane Eickhoff: Significant sites are being uncovered on both sides of the state line, including Island Mound and Newtonia in Missouri. Over in Kansas, the Black Jack Battlefield near BaldwinCity is now acknowledged as the place where the first pitched battle of the Civil War occurred, five years before the guns began pounding FortSumter. This was where the abolitionist John Brown led a ragtag “army” of free-staters against a federal brigade, which was then supportive of the pro-slavery territorial legislature.

Ten years ago the land was put up for sale and a group of local preservationists quickly raised the money to buy it and then painstakingly restored it to its natural state as prairie. It was named a National Historic Landmark in 2012. The Friends of Black Jack have been absolutely heroic in developing this site and telling its story.

For more information visit (http://thebigdivide.com):

 

 Trust

 

September,150 years ago, a Confederate force under General Bushrod Johnson and General Nathan Bedford Forrest engaged Union cavalrymen at Reed’s Bridge. In the ensuing fight, Forrest’s men eventually got the better of their Federal counterparts, but the Yankees had delayed the Confederate advance long enough for the Union Army of the Cumberland to concentrate along Chickamauga Creek. The bloodiest battle of the Civil War in the West had begun.

 

Last month, the Civil War Trust announced its effort to save 109 acres at Reed’s Bridge – the site of the opening action of the Battle of Chickamauga. September 18, on the 150th anniversary of this iconic battle, we are pleased to report that we have raised more than 75% of the funds needed to preserve this important piece of the Chickamauga battlefield. With just one more push, we can raise the last 25% we need to save what Ed Bearss called “one of the most significant tracts of ground that the Civil War Trust has saved in a long time.”

Ten Facts About the Battle of Chickamauga  September 18-20, 1863

The Civil War Trust is working to save 109 acres at Chickamauga.  To expand your appreciation for this preservation opportunity, please consider these ten facts about the Battle of Chickamauga.

Fact # 1: Chickamauga was the largest Confederate victory in the Western theater.

At the end of a summer that had seen the disastrous Confederate loss at Gettysburg and Vicksburg, the triumph of the Army of Tennessee at Chickamauga was a well-timed turn around for the Confederates.  Bragg’s forces at Chickamauga secured a decisive victory, breaking through Federal lines after two days of fierce fighting and the Yankee army into a siege at Chattanooga.  Bragg, however, could not afford another victory like the one at Chickamauga; he lost nearly twenty percent of his effective fighting force.  With 16,170 Union and 18,454 Confederate casualties, the Battle of Chickamauga was the second costliest battle of the Civil War, ranking only behind Gettysburg, and was by far the deadliest battle.

Fact # 2: The Confederate forces outnumbered the Federals at Chickamauga.

Hoping to bolster the Army of Tennessee, Mississippi divisions under Gen. Bushrod Johnson and troops from the Army of Northern Virginia under Gen. James Longstreet were sent to Georgia—the  Confederates’ attempt to transfer troops from one theater to another to achieve numerical superiority.  Longstreet had long advocated a concentration of troops in the West, and despite the resistance of Robert E. Lee, who believed the war would be decided in Virginia, in August Longstreet headed south with two divisions from the First Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia. This move paid off.  Bragg, once reinforced by Johnson and Longstreet, had 65,000 men at his command, compared to the 60,000 men of the Union Army of the Cumberland.

Fact # 3: The Union army did not expect to encounter the Confederates at Chickamauga.

After pushing the Confederates out of Chattanooga early in September, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans assumed that Bragg’s demoralized army would continue retreating further south into Rome, Georgia.  He divided his army into three corps and scattered them throughout Tennessee and Georgia, with Gen. Thomas Crittenden remaining in Chattanooga, and Generals Alexander McCook and George H. Thomas positioned further to the South. When Thomas’s men encountered a large Confederate force at Davis’ Cross Roads, however, Rosecrans realized his mistake – Bragg had in fact concentrated his men at LaFayette, Georgia, where he was expecting reinforcements and was in close proximity to a vulnerable corps of Rosecrans’ army.  Rosecrans immediately ordered his forces to concentrate near Thomas at Stevens’ Gap.  When Bragg’s army crossed West Chickamauga Creek, the Federals had a fight on their hands.

Fact # 4: A fierce skirmish between Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest and Union troops at Reed’s Bridge marked the opening of the battle.

chick

The Battle of Chickamauga (Library of Congress)

Early on September 18, Gen. Bushrod Johnson approached Reed’s Bridge with five infantry brigades, supported by Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s cavalry.  Union Col. Robert Minty, who was charged with guarding Reed’s Bridge, was positioned about a mile east with three infantry regiments supported only by a battalion of cavalry. At 7:30 a.m., Forrest began to skirmish with Minty, who could see long lines of Confederate infantry headed his way. Receiving well-armed reinforcements from Col. John T. Wilder’s Lightning Brigade, the Union troops resisted until noon, when, in one quick onrush, Minty was rapidly pushed across the bridge. He continued to delay Forrest’s cavalry until 3:30, when the Confederates began to ford the river just downstream.

Fact # 5: State-of-the-art repeating rifles played a decisive role in the battle.

Repeating rifles demonstrated their fatal efficiency at the Battle of Chickamauga. Col. John T. Wilder’s famous “Lightning Brigade” of mounted infantry was the first brigade in the Federal army to be armed with Spencer rifles, which enabled the shooter to get off 14 rounds per minute, as opposed to the 2-3 shots per minute of an average Civil War rifle.  Their superior guns enabled the Lightning Brigade to hold Alexander’s Bridge on September 18th in the face of two charges from Gen. St. John Liddell’s Confederates, delaying the Southerners from crossing the creek. The superiority of the repeating rifle would again be demonstrated by the Lightning Brigade on September 20th when, during Longstreet’s breakthrough of the Union line, a division under Gen. Thomas Hindman reached the Widow Glen’s House and were pushed back by unexpected fire from the Spencers of Wilder’s Brigade.  The fire was so heavy that Longstreet momentarily thought a new Federal corps had arrived on the battlefield.

Another unit, the  21st Ohio also demonstrated the usefulness of repeating rifles at Horseshoe Ridge.  These men were armed with Colt repeaters and were vital to holding the last Union stronghold on the field.   The carnage caused by the rifles shocked even the Union men wielding them.  After the battle, Wilder wrote “It actually seemed a pity to kill men so.  They fell in heaps; and I had it in my heart to order the firing to cease, to end the awful sight.”

Fact # 6: Thick woods and swampy terrain made Chickamauga Creek a particularly deadly place to fight.

chick2

Confederate troops advance through the woods (Library of Congress)

Chickamauga Creek, which has been roughly translated from Cherokee to mean “River of Death,” was deep, tree-lined, and bordered by rocky banks.  Most of the areas in which the armies fought were in thickets that presented, as one historian has called it, a “bristling, sticky, irritating obstacle.”

Throughout September 18 and 19, the terrain made clearly drawn battle lines impossible: commanding officers on both sides had little-to-no view of the field, and the armies constantly shifted positions as they unexpectedly ran into each other.  The fluid battle lines in dense woods led to vicious, close quarters combat. Throughout the 19th, as Gen. John Bell Hood moved against the Federal right and Gen. Patrick Cleburne led a sunset assault on the left, units could not easily see or cooperate with each other, leading to extraordinarily high casualties.

Fact # 7: Command confusion and luck enabled the Confederate victory.

On the morning of September 20th, in the face of repeated Confederate assaults, Rosecrans was furiously working to shift men to his hard-pressed left. Once again, the terrain at Chickamauga proved disastrous when the heavy woods concealed a Federal division, causing one of Rosecrans’ staff officers to report that there was a gap in the Union line. Without verifying for himself, Rosecrans ordered Gen. Thomas Wood to shift his division, an order which Wood knew to be a mistake yet followed to avoid reprimand. In a stroke of luck for the Confederates, Gen. James Longstreet had amassed eight brigades ready to charge at the Union line.  At 11:30 a.m., Longstreet ordered the charge forward, unwittingly aiming his striking force in the breach Wood had just created. The Confederates slammed through the line, routing the panicked Union soldiers who promptly scattered in retreat.

Fact # 8: Gen. George H. Thomas earned the name “The Rock of Chickamauga” for his steadfast defense of Horseshoe Ridge.

After Longstreet’s breakthrough, Union resistance crumbled as unit after unit fell back in disorder. With Rosecrans himself retreating back to Chattanooga, Gen. George H. Thomas took control of what was left of the army. His own troops held their ground at Horseshoe Ridge, a strong defensive position. Thomas rallied retreating men from other commands, encouraging them to halt on Snodgrass Hill and begin building breastworks. Longstreet, meanwhile, asked Bragg to reinforce his battle-weary troops, yet Bragg refused.  Throughout the afternoon, Longstreet’s assaults on Horseshoe Ridge were repeatedly repulsed.  Thomas soon received orders from Rosecrans to take command of the army and order a general retreat, which he did soon after nightfall.  For his determination to hold the Union position, even after his commanding officer had left the field, Thomas was later called “the Rock of Chickamauga,” and was considered by Ulysses S. Grant to be one of the finest generals in the Federal army.

Fact # 9: Bragg’s failure to pursue Rosecrans turned the Southern victory into a strategic defeat.

After the Confederate victory on the 20th, Generals Longstreet and Forrest wanted to push on the next morning to destroy Rosecrans’ army before it had a chance to reorganize. Although Bragg’s original plan was the destruction of the Army of the Cumberland and the recapture of Chattanooga, the results of two days of bitter fighting now stalled him. In the Battle of Chickamauga, Bragg had lost 20,000 men – more than twenty percent of his force.  Ten Confederate generals had been killed or wounded, and the losses among his junior officers had been severe. With an eye on his losses, Bragg refused to pursue the fleeing Federals, a move which turned the decisive Southern victory at Chickamauga into a strategic defeat.  Instead, Bragg planned to occupy the heights surrounding Chattanooga and lay siege to the city.  Just two month later, the reinforced Federals drove the Army of Tennessee from their positions around Chattanooga, permanently securing Northern control of the city.  Chickamauga—a battle which cost a Bragg fifth of his army—was turned into a hollow victory.

Fact # 10: The Chickamauga Battlefield was a part of the very first National Military Park

Toward the end of the 19th century, Civil War veterans including the Society of the Army of the Cumberland and the Chickamauga Memorial Association rallied support for creating a national park to preserve the battlefield at Chickamauga as well as nearby sites at Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge.  Congressman Charles H. Grosvenor (who commanded the 18th Ohio at Chickamauga) introduced the bill in Congress in 1890; it was signed by President (and fellow Civil War veteran) Benjamin Harrison in August of that year.  Dedicated on the Battle of Chickamauga’s 32nd anniversary in 1895, the Chickamauga and ChattanoogaNationalMilitaryPark became the first such park established by the Federal government, followed by Shiloh, Gettysburg, Vicksburg, and Antietam.

Though it was already the largest NationalMilitaryPark, Chickamauga and Chattanooga was not complete.  Even at the time of the park’s dedication, a key portion of the battlefield—the site of the opening action at Reed’s Bridge—could not be included in the park due to budgetary constraints.  Today, the Civil War Trust has the opportunity to continue a legacy that began over 100 years ago by acquiring 109 acres at Reed’s Bridge.  This ground, which the veterans themselves wished to preserve is, in the words of historian emeritus of the National Park Service Ed Bearss is “one of the most significant tracts of ground that the Civil War Trust has saved in a long time.”

Courtesy The Civil War Trust

Visit www.civilwar.org how to donate to save Reed’s Bridge.

150

Prairie County Historical Marker Dedication, October 5, 2013

Dedication Ceremony of the New Marker Commemorating DeValls Bluff in the Civil War.

The event will take place at RhodesPark on Highway 70 in DeValls Bluff at 2:00 P.M.

For additional information contact: :
Arnold Family Foundation, Highway 70, DeValls Bluff, AR 72041
Ph: 870-998-2012
http://www.arnoldfamilyfoundation.org/
curtisarnold@cardratings.com

MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History presents: 3rd Iowa Cavalry Flag Returns to Little Rock, September 11, 2013 – October 19, 2013

“The Colors That Bind:  Regimental Flags of the 3rd Iowa Cavalry and the 37th Arkansas Infantry”

On September 10, 1863, Confederate forces under the command of General Sterling Price evacuated Little Rock in advance of Federal forces, thus ending the Little Rock Campaign.  By 7:00 p.m., civil authorities formally surrendered the capital of Arkansas, making it the fourth Southern capital to come under Federal control.   The Little Rock Campaign was significant for several reasons. It effectively restricted Confederate Arkansas to the southern half of the state, ending plans to use the state as a staging ground for efforts against Missouri. Politically, it started the process of establishing a loyal state government under Lincoln’s Presidential Reconstruction.

To commemorate the 150thanniversary of the Little Rock Campaign,
the MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History will host a temporary exhibit of two Civil War regimental flags  – the 3rd Iowa Cavalry and the 37thArkansas Infantry.  Troops from the 3rd Iowa Cavalry were among the first Federal troops to enter Little Rock and capture the Arsenal on September 10, 1863.  The framed flag from that regiment also contains ribbons from the unit’s various campaigns, including Pea Ridge, Vicksburg and Little Rock.  The flag from the 37th
Arkansas Infantry was captured by Iowa forces at the Battle of Helena on July 4, 1863.  Survivors of the 37thArkansas Infantry were among
those defending Little Rock in September 1863.

Both flags are on loan from the State Historical Museum, Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs and have never been exhibited in Arkansas before.  The exhibit is free to the public and can be seen from September 11 – October 19 during the museum’s normal hours.

For additional information contact:
MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History,503 E. 9th Street, Little Rock, AR 72202 Ph: 501-376-4602  www.arkmilitaryheritage.com/

Camp Nelson Confederate Cemetery: Saturday, October 12

Grand Prairie Civil War Roundtable with R.D. Keever

 

Local historian and CampNelson researcher, R.D. Keever will share a display and history of Confederate Camp Nelson on Saturday, October 12. The event will be from 1:00 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. Keever will set up his period tent and will bring his horse that will have period tack. On display will be artifacts from CampNelson. During the fall of 1862, 1500 Texas and Arkansas Confederate troops died of disease while at the camp. Keever will answer any questions concerning the history of the camp. CampNelson is located at the corner of Cherry Road and Rye Drive, south of Campground Road east of Cabot. For additional information contact the Rick Meadows with the Grand Prairie Civil War Roundtable at 501-327-9222 or rmeadows@aaamissouri.com

 

 

Civil War Roundtable Speakers 2013

 

Mark and Joe are participating in a prisoner exchange.

Joe will be our speaker in June, Mark in July!

 

  • January – William Shea – History Professor at the University of Arkansas at Monticello – Samuel Curtis: The Man Who Conquered Arkansas
  • February – StuartTowns – Retired professor and author from ForrestCity – Enduring Legacy: Rhetoric and Ritual of the Lost Cause
  • March – Lorien Foote – History Professor at the University of Central Arkansas – Trails of Blood: Escaping the Confederacy
  • April – Dr. Paul Haynie – History Professor at HardingUniversity – 7 Most Important Shots fired in the Civil War.
  • May – Brian Brown – Local historian – The Saps at the Battle of Vicksburg
  • June – Mark Christ – Community Outreach Director, Arkansas Historic Preservation Program –        Skirmish at Paroquet Bluff
  • July – Joseph Herron – Parker Ranger – The Battle of Arkansas Post
  • August – Conway Women’s Choir – Period Music
  • September – Aaron Barnhart- Author from Kansas City – The Big Divide: A Travel Guide to Historic and Civil War Sites in the Missouri-Kansas Border Region
  • October – Josh Williams , Curator at OldWashingtonState Park – Old Washington in the War
  • November – Rev. David Dyer, Pastor – Robert Lewis Dabney, Chief of Staff for Stonewall Jackson 

Thank you to the Conway Women’s Chorus who brought our program thru music last month!  We hope to see you Tuesday with Aaron Barnhart and Diane Eichkhoff.

 

September 17, 1863

September 17, 2013

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE INDIAN TERRITORY,
Camp on Middle Boggy, C. N., September 17, 1863.
Brig. Gen. W. R. BOGGS, Chief of Staff:
GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose herewith duplicate of communication addressed from these headquarters to Major Snead, assistant adjutant-general District of Arkansas; also copy of instructions given Brigadier-General Cabell for his government. I respectfully forward these for the purpose of explanation and information as regards late movements in the Indian Territory. This evening a courier arrived at my headquarters, bringing sundry communications from Brigadier-General Cabell’s brigade, but not a line from General C. to myself. The information reaches me, unofficially, that General Cabell has gone with his brigade to Little Rock, under orders, it is reported, from district headquarters. Being deprived of this force at this important juncture, leaves me, I fear, no other alternative than the adoption of a purely defensive policy. I have heard nothing from General Bankhead for several days past. When last heard from he had reached Waldron, at or near which place he had pushed forward, in view of my orders directing him to form a junction with General Cabell. On reaching that point, General C. was found to have retired some 50 or 60 miles to the southward, in the direction indicated in the inclosed copy of letter to Major Snead, assistant adjutant-general, &c. On learning that General Bankhead had gone in the direction of Waldron, I immediately dispatched a courier, directing him to reassume a position on the road leading from Fort Smith to this point. I am not a little uneasy as to General Bankhead’s position since failing to unite his forces with those of General Cabell, and being in a position, when last heard from, in which, by a flank movement of the enemy on the road last referred to, he may be forced to retire on the same route as that adopted by General Cabell, in which event my front will be entirely uncovered, and I shall have no other force than Cooper’s brigade to oppose to any movement of the enemy in that direction. I, however, have confidence in General Bankhead’s sagacity and skill, though my opportunities of forming a judgment in this respect have been limited. Coopers brigade (being my entire remaining force)has been ordered forward Within supporting distance of General B., taking it for granted that he has pursued my directions. As soon as I am re-enforced, as I learn I am to be, and receive the battery sent me by order of Lieutenant-General Smith, I shall push my lines as far northward as circumstances may allow. This I feel to be the more necessary, as the occupation of the country of the Indians by the enemy is having a very ill effect with them. The terms offered them by the enemy have, and will continue to have so long as they are permitted to occupy their country, the effect of desertions from us. But few of the Indians can be induced to leave their particular country. This state of things I am most anxious to avoid, not that the Indians, particularly the Creeks, are of much service to us as soldiers, but, armed and equipped as they can be by our enemies, they may do us much harm.
The importance of furnishing the lieutenant-general commanding with accurate information concerning the condition of affairs in this Territory, and the difficulties of communication with district headquarters, must plead my apology for this hastily written communication.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
WM. STEELE,
Brigadier-General.

Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission

September 10, 1863

September 10, 2013

One hundred fifty years ago, on September 10, 1863, Thomas Barb of Dobbins’ Arkansas Cavalry wrote of the fall of Little Rock: Thursday 10th September We was ordered to saddle up last night about 2,o’clock and this morning about sun up was ordered to move. I was left on picket on the Arkansas River. There has been heavy cannonading up and down the River all morning the feds has come across they layed there pontoon Bridge last night and crossed, our battery never knew any thing of it till this morning and then it was to late we started for little Rock about 11,o’clock stoped on Bayou and dismounted and succeeded in driving them back once captureing a good many horses and some prisoners and two small pieces of Artillery then they come up with there infantry and drove us back our major [i.e., Major Samuel Corley, 1st (Dobbin's) Arkansas Cavalry] was mortally wounded. we come through little Rock about 4,o’clock this evening and there found the whole army under a full retreat without ever giving them a general fight so the big expected fight for our capitol is come and gone and wasent nothing but a skirmish the cavalry done all the fighting

Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission